Copy

Newsletter
Summer Share #18  
September 28 - October 4, 2015

 

View this email in your browser

bumble bees loving the sunflowers

Table of Contents 
 (Click on the links to go directly to an item or scroll down.)


 

Full share box this week - bounty of fall!

Calendar & Reminders:

Last pickup dates. We are getting to the end of the summer shares. See section in newsletter to determine your last day to pickup a box.

All the recipes from this year's newsletters are now listed on our webpage. They are not really organized at this point (I hope to get to that shortly!) but at least they are all on the same page. Here is the link that will take you directly to the recipe page.
http://www.myfinehomestead.com/recipes.htm

Winter Shares AvailableShares are delivered twice a month, Nov - March. Madison pickup available.
 http://www.myfinehomestead.com/2015-shares .

We rinse your produce however we recommend washing the produce in your box before eating it. 

Previous editions of our newsletter are on our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/pages/My-Fine-Homestead/145013635612327

Contact us with any questions. We are always happy to talk "food" with you!

 

Last Pickup Dates for Summer Shares
We're getting to the end of the summer shares so I am including the last few pickup dates to help you keep it straight. Please let me know if you have any questions.

Madison
Thursdays EOW shares - October 8
Thursdays every week shares - October 1, 8, 15

Muscoda
Friday every week shares - October 2, 9,16

Spring Green
Thursday every week shares - October 1, 8, 15
Saturday EOW shares - October 3, 17
Saturday every week shares - October 3, 10, 17

Prairie du Chien
Thursday EOW shares - October 1, 15
Thursday every week shares - October 1, 8, 15

Plain
Monday EOW shares - October 5, 19
Monday every week shares - October 5, 12, 19


Yearly Shares continue every week. I will email you individually to confirm pickup information for after the regular shares end.

Please remember to return your boxes, even the last one. You may want to bring your own box or bag for your last pickup and transfer your produce leaving our box at the pickup site so you don't have to deal with it later. Thank you!

Please note: This is the produce we harvested and packed for Thursday's shares. The Saturday and Monday boxes will be similar but may change depending on produce availability.
 

Full Share Box :  (Black Plastic or Brown Wax Box - with your name)

Mustard/Turnip Greens Mix - 1/2 lb = Thursday & Friday boxes
 or
Ovation Greens Mix - 1/2 lb = Saturday, Sunday, Monday boxes
 

Either type of greens can be eaten fresh or cooked with a little olive oil 
 

Green Beans - 1 1/2 lb
Tomatoes -  2 Rose heirlooms
Peppers: 1 Carmen Pepper - Italian "bull's horn" sweet frying pepper. 
       2 Bell Peppers - green, red, and/or yellow

Toscano (Dinosaur or Lacinto) Kale - 1 bunch
Purple Cabbage - 1 or 2 for EOW members The purple cabbages are small and have suffered some damage, but we cleaned them and are including them in the box as they are beautiful grated in salads or cole slaw.
Carrots - 1+ lb These carrots are from Crossroads Community Farm and are organic.
Celeriac - 1 See Vegetable Spotlight in this newsletter
Winter Squash - 1 Delicata & 1 Sunshine Kabocha - you can eat the skin of the delicate. Stored at room temperature, these squash will keep a couple months.

Garlic - 1 bulb 
Onion - 1 yellow
Sunflower - 1, just because it is pretty :) Cut off the end of the stem at an angle, remove any leaves that are in the way and put in a vase (we weighted ours with a few pieces of gravel to make sure it wouldn't tip) of water. Voila! - a beautiful centerpiece for dinner.

Please note: This is the produce we harvested and packed for Thursday's shares. The Saturday and Monday boxes will be similar but may change depending on produce availability.

 Half Share Box : (White Wax Box - take the one with your name)

 
Mustard/Turnip Greens Mix - 1/2 lb = Thursday & Friday boxes
 or
Ovation Greens Mix - 1/2 lb = Saturday, Sunday, Monday boxes
 

Either type of greens can be eaten fresh or cooked with a little olive oil 

Green Beans - 1 lb
Tomatoes -  1 Rose heirloom
Bell Peppers 1 Green
Toscano (Dinosaur or Lacinto) Kale - 1 bunch
Carrots - 1 lb These carrots are from Crossroads Community Farm and are organic.
Winter Squash - 1 Delicata - you can eat the skin of the delicata. Stored at room temperature, this squash will keep a couple months.
Sunflower - 1, just because it is pretty :) Cut off the end of the stem at an angle, remove any leaves that are in the way and put in a vase (we weighted ours with a few pieces of gravel to make sure it wouldn't tip) of water. Voila! - a beautiful centerpiece for dinner.

 

Vegetable Spotlight on Celeriac

Also called celery root or turnip-rooted celery, this brown knobby has a flavor profile similar to celery but a little stronger and deeper. It can substitute for celery in vegetable medleys or stand on its own in purees, gratins or soups. Remove the thick, bumpy outer layer with a paring knife. It may lose up to half its weight in the process. If not using right away, you can float it in a bowl of water acidified with a little lemon juice or vinegar to keep it from browning however in most cooked dishes, a little discoloration is unimportant.

Europeans, who are more familiar with celeriac than they are with stem celery, enjoy celeriac raw. They'll grate, shred, or julienne the hard off-white flesh and marinate it in a salad dressing (vinaigrette, mayonnaise or a mustardy remoulade) overnight. A generous mound on a bed of fresh salad greens makes a substantial salad that can replace the starch in a meal.

Compared with potatoes, celery roots are a bit firmer and less starchy, but the two cook up beautifully together. See recipe in this newsletter.



 
Potato and Celeriac Root Mash with Brown Butter
The Four Season Farm Gardener's Cookbook
serves 4 to 6 as a side dish

Celeriac and potatoes are a natural match. They are combined at proportions of two to one in this recipe, but use equal amounts for an even more pronounced celery flavor. For a hearty meal, serve this mash with some greens (in a salad or cooked) and a few fat sausages.

 

1 large celery root
4 medium-size potatoes
5 tablespoons butter
1 medium-sized onion, peeled and finely chopped
1 1/4 cup heavy (whipping) cream
1 large bay leaf preferably fresh
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves or 1/2 teaspoon dried
salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves

1. Fill a medium-large saucepan halfway with water, and bring to a boil over high heat.
2. While water is heating, trim and peel celeriac, removing all brown parts and cutting off whatever remains of the leafy top. Scrub it clean, and then cut it into 1-inch chunks.
3. Scrub the potatoes but do not peel them. (The puree would be more elegant, but less nutritious, without the potato skins.) Cut them into 1-inch chunks.
4. Add the celery root and potatoes to the boiling water and return it to a boil. Then reduce the heat to a brisk simmer and cook, partially covered, until both vegetables feel soft when pricked with a fork, 15 to 20 minutes. Drain and set aside.
5. Rinse and dry the pan, and then put it back over low heat. Add 2 tablespoons of the butter, and when it has melted, add the chopped onion. Cook, stirring, until the onion is soft and translucent, about 10 minutes.
6. Add the cream, bay leaf, and thyme. Simmer very slowly so the herbs will steep in the cream and flavor it, about 5 minutes. Then remove and discard the bay leaf.
7. Add the potatoes and celeriac to the cream mixture and stir for several minutes to combine and reheat. Mash with a hand potato masher or an immersion blender right in the pan. (Resist the urge to use a ricer, which works for potatoes but turns celery root into a grainy mess.) Add salt to taste, and then set the pan aside, covered.
8. Place the remaining 3 tablespoons butter in a small non-aluminum pant that does not have a dark bottom (so you can track the changes in color), and melt it over medium-low heat. It will bubble and foam, so watch it and turn the heat down if it seems about to boil over. The milky particles will darken and sink to the bottom, but should not blacken. The butter will turn a slightly brown color, with a wonderful rich flavor.
9. Spoon the mashed mixture into a warmed shallow bowl, making a shallow pattern of swirls or ridges on top. Pour the brown butter over the top, so that it collects in the hollows. Grind black pepper to taste over the top, sprinkle with the parsley, and serve hot.

 

Gingered Carrots
Farm Fresh and Fast
4 servings

1 pound carrots, peeled and sliced
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
salt and ground black pepper to taste

Fill a medium pot with water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Add the carrots, reduce the heat to medium, and cook until the carrots float and are tender (8-10 minutes). Drain the carrots in a colander. Melt the butter in the pot used for the carrots. Return the carrots to the pot and add the ginger, tossing to coat the carrots evenly with ginger and melted butter. Season with salt and pepper and serve hot.

Pasta with Winter Squash and Tomatoes
serves 4

Salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup sliced shallots or onions
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes, or to taste
2 cups chopped tomatoes
1 1/2 to 2 pounds peeled, cubed or shredded butternut or other winter squash, about 5 cups
8 ounces ziti or penne cut pasta
Freshly chopped parsley or Parmesan, for garnish

Bring a large pot of water to a boil and salt it. Put olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add shallots, garlic, and pepper flakes and cook for about 1 minute; add tomatoes and squash, and cook with some salt and pepper.
When squash is tender, about 10 minutes for shreds, 15 or so for small cubes, cook the pasta until it is tender. Combine the sauce and pasta, and serve, garnished with parsley or Parmesan.

Kale Soup with Farro
serves 4
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup chopped onion
2 cups chopped carrot
1 1/2 cups chopped celery
2 cups chopped peeled tomatoes (fresh or canned)
5 cups vegetable broth
1 1/2 cups faro (spelt or barley may be substituted)
3 cups chopped kale
salt and ground pepper to taste

Heat the olive oil over medium heat for 1 minute. Add the onion, carrot, and celery and sauté until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes, broth, and farro. Bring to a broil, then reduce the heat to medium-low. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes. Stir in the kale and simmer uncovered for 5 - 10 minutes more. Season with salt and pepper.

 

On the Farm . . . what's happening this week in words and pictures.

Last Friday saw us in the River Valley Homecoming Parade as part of the Spring Green Farmers Market entry. Bill pushed the garden cart full of baskets and produce, Liam rode in the tractor-pulled trailer with Johnny Johnson, the eldest member of our market, Aidan, Marlee and I walked the route along with others handing out cherry tomatoes and green beans. It was a lot of work but also a lot of fun. As you can see from the pictures, Aidan needed a snooze before we even got going!  

Back on the farm, Bill has been preoccupied with digging a trench across our driveway and installing electrical and water lines to our pack shed. He loves projects in which he operates big machinery. The power, the engine noise, the ability to make big changes in a short amount of time, it is all very satisfying to him. Aidan was also awed by the process. He was Bill's right-hand man, measuring the trench and giving directions. I'm afraid I don't get as excited as Bill might like me to be, but I did come out and take pictures. 

The kids and our dog, Bindi, thought it great fun to go down in the tunnel and to jump across it. The dirt is all replaced now, but the driveway still needs a layer of gravel. Mud is being tracked everywhere including in the house, but more importantly, we are ready to clean our winter share produce in the pack shed this year. And that does make me excited!


Have a great week,

Stacey

Enter your email to subscribe to our mailing list:
 
 
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
Twitter
Website
Website
Email
Email
YouTube
YouTube
Copyright © 2015 My Fine Homestead, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp