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Newsletter
Summer Share #6  
July 6-12, 2015

 

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working on the newsletter this morning

Table of Contents 
 (Click on the links to go directly to an item or scroll down.)


 

My sister and work-share member, Nicole, with an armlful of broccoli.

My niece and work-share member, Celia, with a armful of cabbage.

Calendar & Reminders

Box Pickup - to help you find your box more efficiently, your name is now posted on both the front and back sides in a bright color. Please take the box with your name on it. Thank you.

July 26th,1 to 4pm - Farm Party.

Sunday, September 20 - Bike the Barns Event. 
http://www.csacoalition.org/news/2015-bike-the-barns/

All produce is soaked, sprayed off or dunked in cold water to remove dirt and to cool it down. However we recommend washing the produce in your box before eating or preparing it. If you don't have one - you may want to pick up a salad spinner for washing and spinning greens. They are relatively inexpensive.  My sister calls it a "game-changer" if you eat lots of lettuce! 
 
Please remember to return your empty white wax box or black plastic box each week. If you'd rather not have to remember it, you can bring your own bag/box to the drop-site, change out your produce and leaving the box there.

Previous editions of our newsletter are on our Facebook page.
https://www.facebook.com/pages/My-Fine-Homestead/145013635612327

This Week's Box

Please note: This is the produce we harvested and packed for Thursday's shares. The Saturday and Monday boxes will be similar but may change depending on produce availability.
 

Full Share:  (Black Box - take the one with your name)

Salad Leaf Mesclun (Mix) - 1/2lb Mix of green & red mild leaf lettuces.
Broccoli - 1 medium to large or 2 to 3 small heads .
Baby Zucchini or Green Striped Summer Squash - 2 or 3 Tender and sweet, these are the first of the season! You can eat these raw, but our favorite way is to slice and saute in a little butter until they are lightly browned.
Cabbage - 1  Tender, thin, crisp, peppery-sweet leaves.
Baby Beets - 1 bunch 
Sugar Snap Peas - 1/2 lb Crunchy, sweet and juicy both the pod and peas are edible. Remove the string along the front before eating by grasping the stem, snapping and pulling the string down and off.
Walla Walla Onion - 1 Referred to as sweet or mild onions are at their best raw or lightly cooked. These onions do not store as well as storage onions so use within a couple weeks and keep in a cool, dry place with good circulation.
Cilantro - 1 bunch Small, leafy bunch of herbs. Can store this herb in the refrigerator.
See recipe in last week's newsletter.
Basil - 1 bunch Basil has bigger, wider leaves than cilantro which are prized for their wonderful flavor, welcoming aroma and soft texture. You can toss whole leaves in your salad or coarsely chop into ribbons to add to almost any dish you are preparing. Basil turns brown or black when stored in the fridge. The best way to keep it, is to cut off the very ends of the stems (since we harvested it the day before and they have sealed up) and put in a jar of water on your windowsill, counter or even as a centerpiece on your table. See recipes in this newsletter.


 

Half Share: (White Wax Box - take the one with
your name)

 

Salad Leaf Mesclun (Mix) - 1/2lb Mix of green & red mild leaf lettuces.
Cabbage - 1  Tender, thin, crisp, peppery-sweet leaves.
Sugar Snap Peas - 1/2 lb Crunchy, sweet and juicy both the pod and peas are edible. Remove the string along the front before eating by grasping the stem, snapping and pulling the string down and off.
Walla Walla Onion - 1 Referred to as sweet or mild onions are at their best raw or lightly cooked. These onions do not store as well as storage onions so use within a couple weeks and keep in a cool, dry place with good circulation.
Cilantro - 1 bunch Small, leafy bunch of herbs. Can store this herb in the refrigerator.
See recipe in last week's newsletter.
Basil - 1 bunch Basil has bigger, wider leaves than cilantro which are prized for their wonderful flavor, welcoming aroma and soft texture. You can toss whole leaves in your salad or coarsely chop into ribbons to add to almost any dish you are preparing. Basil turns brown or black when stored in the fridge. The best way to keep it, is to cut off the very ends of the stems (since we harvested it the day before and they have sealed up) and put in a jar of water on your windowsill, counter or even as a centerpiece on your table. See recipes in this newsletter.
 

Coming Soon:
Summer Squash, Zucchini, Peas, Green Beans, Carrots

*** Feel free to contact us with any questions on the contents of your box or for ideas of what to do with them. We are happy to talk "food" with you! ***

On the Farm . . . what's happening this week in words and pictures 

We've been using an old display cooler to store produce in between harvesting and delivery to share members or farmers markets. When we first used it, we thought it was great - so much better than the refrigerator in the garage we started with. Now three years later, we've outgrown it also. The compressor is finicky and has required constant monitoring to ensure produce doesn't freeze or get too warm. 
 

So our big project for the week was to move the 8 ft by 10 ft walk-in cooler left in an old building when we bought the farm to our pack shed across the drive-way. A trip of about seventy-five yards. It didn't have a floor to help keep it square while being moved, so Bill wrapped cables around it as well as screwing some 4x6 beams underneath for stability. He put steel pipes under the beams, and he and Liam slowly (over a day and a half) rolled it out the old building, across the driveway and into place in it's new home. It was slow and tedious work, but a great project for father and son. 

Then Bill went to work installing an insulated floor with a laminated cover in the cooler. The heating and cooling technician came and connected the thermostat and voila! - instead of a small display cooler, we have a working walk-in cooler big enough to hold lots and lots of produce. Later when we aren't as busy in the field, we will spiff up the front with paint, but for now, we are pleased to have a bigger cooler that consistently works.

Pictures of different stages of the work, including one of our smaller cooler next to the walk-in, and a couple videos (courtesy of Liam) follow. Here are the direct links to you tube if the shortcuts don't work. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76fMdFTq9bs and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HX9-ifZyCU4 .

Bill explaining to Liam how he plans to move the 8 ft x10 ft walk-in cooler approximately 120 yds from an old building to our pack shed.

Moving Cooler 2

The move starts! Liam seems skeptical about how well this will work (good thing he isn't an Egyptian). It actually took a day and a half (partly because there were other jobs that needed Bill's attention) so this is just the beginning.

Yogurt Cheese with Fresh Herbs
(Farm Fresh and Fast)

4 c regular or low-fat yogurt, without pectin or other thickeners (Greek-style yogurt works well
 Salt and ground black pepper to taste
1/4 c chopped herbs of choice

Line a strainer with cheesecloth or torn coffee filters, completely covering the bottom and sides. In a medium bowl, combine the yogurt with about 1 teaspoon of salt and a few grinds of pepper, stirring well. Pour the yogurt into the lined strainer. Set the strainer over a larger bowl, leaving space at the bottom for the liquid to drain from the yogurt. Cover and refrigerate overnight, or until the consistency is similar to cream cheese (Greek-style yogurt will take less time.)
When the yogurt has reached the desired consistency, remove it from the refrigerator, discard the drained liquid, and transfer the yogurt cheese to a sealable storage container. Stir in the chopped herbs and adjust the seasonings. Store in the refrigerator.

 

Lemon Pesto Dressing
(Four Season Farm Gardener's Cookbook)
Barbara Damrosch, author of the recipe, describes this dressing as a lighter, less intense version of traditional pesto, more liquid than paste-like. She uses it to dress tossed salads, sometimes adding finely grated Parmesan cheese while tossing and says it is also good for basting meat or fish.


 
1/2 c (firmly packed) fresh basil leaves
1 small clove garlic
2 Tbl fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 c olive oil

 
1. Place the basil, garlic, lemon juice, salt, and pepper to taste in a blender or food processor.
2. Turn the processor on and gradually pour in the olive oil. Process just long enough to make a coarse puree, about 20 seconds. (Too much blending will over-oxidize the basil.)
3. This dressing will keep, covered, in the refrigerator for several days.

Solar Harvest Group Buy for Farms and Residential Homes
 

Dear CSA Members,

We are excited to tell you about the Solar Harvest Group Buy being organized by the FairShare CSA Coalition and H&H Solar.  Solar is abundant, renewable, and can help you become energy independent.   Now is a great time to join the Solar Group Buy AND take advantage of other cost-saving incentives for solar power!  Learn about all the incentives in the Solar Harvest Brochure.  Anyone can join the group buy!

When you join, you not only save money, you also help the CSA farm movement!  For every system installed, H&H Solar will make a set donation to Fairshare’s grower education program which provides valuable programming for CSA farmers throughout the region and does important work connecting us (farmers) to you (eaters) and vice versa.  

There were 10 solar systems installed as part of the 2014 solar group buy.  Collectively, these systems saved over $17,500 in installation costs and H&H made a matching donation to FairShare.  Seven farms in the coalition now have solar power and those systems are doing very well.  See one system in action and surpassing projected energy production just 7 months after installation at this post.

Join the clean energy revolution, support a local business, and make a donation to Fairshare CSA Coalition.  Now your home’s energy can be produced by the sun, just like your veggies!  Click to learn more about Fairshare’s Solar Group Buy 2015.  

Thank you!

                                   Liam and Grandma D at market.
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