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Newsletter
Summer Share #20  
October 12 - 18, 2015

 

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Table of Contents 
 (Click on the links to go directly to an item or scroll down.)


 

A lapful of baby bunnies.

Calendar, Announcements & Reminders:

This is the last box of the summer share season. Winter shares begin November 5 in Madison, November 6 in Spring Green and Muscoda. Yearly members will continue receiving boxes the weeks between. You will receive an email November 1st with details.

Madison & Prairie du Chien members - return your last boxes by next Thursday to your pickup site. Thank you!

Watch for a final evaluation form in your email that you can complete and return to us if you'd like.

Market share members -
I will include a summary of your share with your evaluation form. If you have a credit balance remaining, you can use it on winter produce, broiler chickens, a Thanksgiving turkey, body care or save it for next year.

MES members - I will include a summary of your share with your final evaluation form. We can make arrangements for getting your final deliveries to you.

All the recipes from this year's newsletters are on our website. 
http://www.myfinehomestead.com/recipes.htm

See previous editions of our newsletter at https://www.facebook.com/pages/My-Fine-Homestead/145013635612327 . Be sure to "Like" our page.
 

Please note: This is the produce we harvested and packed for Thursday's shares. The Saturday and Monday boxes will be similar but may change depending on produce availability.
 

Full Share Box :  (Black Plastic or Brown Wax Box)

Salad Turnips - 1 bunch Tasty raw or sliced in a salad
Watermelon Radish - 1 bunch
Mesclun Lettuce
- 3/4 lb 

Cherry Tomatoes - 1 pint
Peppers - 4 (combination of Bell & Carmen) Easily freeze extra peppers to add to you favorite dishes in the future by removing the top, ribs and seeds, dicing and putting in a freezer bag or container. Label and put in the freezer.
Baby Carrots - 1/2 lb  
Potatoes - 1 lb Variety is Superior and has white skin & flesh. It is good for all types of cooking and originated at the University of Wisconsin in 1962. (Some of you may find a couple Carola,yellow skin & flesh mixed in.)
Rutabaga - 1 or 2 Cooking ideas include roasted with sweetly caramelized onions, added to hearty vegetable soups, either chunky or pureed, or mashed with potatoes.

Winter Squash - 1 Butternut Traditionally prepared by cutting in half, scooping out seeds and roasting either upright or upside down in a pan with about an inch of water or upside down on a cookie sheet. Butternut makes an excellent pumpkin pie or try the soup recipe in this newsletter. Will store at room temperature for up to a month. Can keep for several months in a dry location at 50 - 55 degrees Fahrenheit.
Onion - 1 yellow & 1 red
 

Please note: This is the produce we harvested and packed for Thursday's shares. The Saturday and Monday boxes will be similar but may change depending on produce availability.

 Half Share Box : (White Wax Box  - with your name)

Salad Turnips - 1 bunch Tasty raw or sliced in a salad
Mesclun Lettuce - 1/2 lb 
Cherry Tomatoes - 1 pint
Peppers - 3 (combination of Bell & Carmen) Easily freeze extra peppers to add to you favorite dishes in the future by removing the top, ribs and seeds, dicing and putting in a freezer bag or container. Label and put in the freezer.
Potatoes - 1 lb Variety is Superior and has white skin & flesh. It is good for all types of cooking and originated at the University of Wisconsin in 1962. (Some of you may find a couple Carola,yellow skin & flesh mixed in.)
Winter Squash - 1 Delicata or 1 Sunshine Kabocha Traditionally prepared by cutting in half, scooping out seeds and roasting either upright or upside down in a pan with about an inch of water or upside down on a cookie sheet. Or try the recipe in this newsletter. Will store at room temperature for a few weeks. Can keep for a month or maybe two in a dry location at 50 - 55 degrees Fahrenheit.
Onion - 1 yellow & 1 red
 

Easy Butternut Squash Soup
6 servings
 

2 Tablespoons butter or olive oil
3-4 cloves garlic, mashed with side of thick knife
1/2 - 1 cup  chopped onion
2 1/2 - 3 pounds butternut squash, halved, seeded and baked until soft
4 cups chicken stock or 2 bouillon cubes dissolved in 4 cups hot water
1 bay leaf
pinch of sugar
1/2 teaspoon or more curry powder
pinch of nutmeg
salt and pepper to taste
2 cups milk

Heat butter or olive oil in large saucepan over medium flame. Add garlic and onions; cook, stirring often, 7 - 10 minutes. Puree the cooked squash in a food processor and stir into onion mixture. Stir in stock, bay leaf, sugar, curry powder, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Simmer 20 - 30 minutes. Remove bay leaf. Add the milk; heat but don't boil.

Kabocha Squash, Japanese Style
(can substitute any thin or medium skin winter squash like Buttercup or Delicata)

makes 4 to 6 servings

1 squash, cut into 2 inch cubes, leave skin on
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup honey or brown sugar
Bring several inches water to boil in a saucepan; cube and add squash. Add more water to cover if needed. Bring to boil again, reduce heat, and add soy sauce and honey. Cook until squash is tender, 10 - 15 minutes. Drain and serve.
On the Farm . . . what's happening this week in words and pictures.

Part 2 of our farm life questions and answers: (part 1 is in the last newsletter)

Do you consider yourself a farmer? 
Aidan: I think it is cool that we grow our own vegetables. (I took that as a "yes".)
Marlee: Yes, because I like to be around goats.
Bill: I guess I see myself as a homesteader because I'm trying to grow much of our food here. I like knowing where our it comes from, I feel good being fairly self-sufficient, and I enjoy learning the processes of growing and preparing food and supplies. I like the challenge of figuring it all out and making it even better.
Stacey: I do. It is what I wanted to do from a young age, but I didn't know how or what kind of farmer. I feel very satisfied in this moment in my life to be a woman farming organically, on a polyculture farm
(the simultaneous cultivation of several crops or kinds of animals) that sells directly to local communities through CSA membership and farmers markets. I'm in the right place at the right time with the right people - I'm so grateful.

Do you think it important/beneficial that we make our own soaps/lotions?
Marlee:  It is nice because if we need a bar of soap we just go get one out of the soap boxes. We don't have to go to the store. And I like to smell the different essential oils and guess what they are.
Bill: Yes, it fits in with homesteading.
Liam: I guess so.
Stacey: Yes, yes, yes! My skin used to be so dry and itchy especially in the winter. Now it isn't. I love feeling good about what we use on our skin.

Would you like to live on a farm when you grow up?
Aidan:
Yes, I will have Aracauna chickens, dogs, some grouse,and five or six Alpine goats. It will be a zoo!
Marlee: Yes, because I like being by animals. I play with them and watch them and climb on rocks with them. I would plant gladiolas and roses because they are pretty.
Liam: I'm not sure. I think so, but I might try living in town just to try it. It might seem too close to other people though, and I like to be outside a lot.

Why do you think local farming is important in a cultural sense?
Bill:
I feel less vulnerable because we have these resources. I also feel like I can help others if there was some emergency like the Y2 scare or 9/11 making food and supplies scarce. I hope nothing like that ever happens, and I know our farm can't save the world, but we are all better off if there are local farmers around. 
Stacey: I think it is important to be close to your food supply by either growing your own or by knowing your farmers and their practices. That food and relationship contribute positively toward the quality of a person's life physically, emotionally and possibly even spiritually. It is also community building. I am certain our world is better when everyone has access to locally grown food. I am proud to be part of making our members' lives better.

Thank you for joining our farm this season. While slowing down a bit sounds nice, we will miss packing your box. If you are taking a break from CSA, we wish you a good fall and winter and hope you will consider being a member again. 2016 shares will be available January 1st with a discount for early sign-up. Be sure to watch the newsletter for reminders. 

If you are continuing with us as a yearly, market or winter share member - rock on! The cold-hardy produce is growing, and we have exciting winter produce ideas for you.


Stacey

P.S. 
Below are some miscellaneous photos from the last couple weeks.

 

Frying peppers for supper.
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