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The Week In Context: JANUARY 28TH, 2017

MUST READS OF THE WEEK

WILEY: THE ENIGMATIC GODFATHER OF GRIME

The Guardian have really stepped up their Long Reads section in recent times. Regularly daily offerings of essays mostly of great quality have been appearing, including this excellent contribution by Dan Hancox, as the Grime genre continues to build momentum following Skepta’s Mercury Prize win.

THE INVISIBLE CITY: THE CINEMA OF SURVEILLANCE

Laura Robertson
The Double Negative
“Ready to donate our private information in exchange for a life online, we have become addicted to other people’s lives, and exposing our own.” The Double Negative’s editor (and soon-to-be Cureditor guest curator) Laura Robertson visits a St Helens event and finds a public openly embracing surveillance.

 

BLUE LIES MATTER

“A cop’s word is often the difference between a person’s freedom and imprisonment.” A slickly put together investigative piece by BuzzFeed that looks into 62 cases where video footage contradicts the testimony of police officers involved in the incidents.

 

ARCHITECTURAL LEGACY OF THE EU: WHAT REMAINS AFTER BREXIT?

Discover – Something by a publisher new to Cureditor this week
Tim Abrahams
ICON

Of all the EU funding projects, it’s probably the scientific research projects that get the most attention. But there are more holes to fill, pointed out here by Tim Abrahams who marks the buildings that were funded or part-funded by EU initiatives, perhaps revealing how regional academia and business may suffer.

HOT TOPIC

RESISTANCE

One of the tropes I struggle with is the condition of "surviving" our current times. Yes, you survive a car accident, a natural disaster or a terminal illness, but surviving a dinner party, Valentine's Day or indeed a Donald Trump presidency is not just erroneous it neglects your ability to act. Such misapplied use of survivalism is brilliantly described by social critic Christopher Lasch in the 1980s and is characteristic of a passivity that pervades contemporary thought. So, how refreshing the Women's March has been. Put aside the fact that Donald Trump won a democratic process to become President, the protests and resistance we see since is not questioning the legitimacy of the result but the actions of the man. Acts of protest are necessary in getting voices heard – bedding down and putting fingers in your ears solves nothing, including your own sense of responsibility.

the future of the left is female

In a recent discussion at the LSE in London, various political thinkers discussed the American Left in America, and the rising diverse generation of activists to overcome a somewhat immobile political identity. This great article claims that women’s rights are becoming more interconnected and the political force the Left requires.

SIGN LANGUAGE'S ANTI-AUTHORITARIAN STREAK

“The continued resistance of President Pea-Brain.” A very interesting description of a form of resistance and humour in American Sign Language that wittily, with a twist of the wrist and facial expression, transforms the sign for ‘Government’ to the sign for ‘pea-brain’.

LISTEN: THE CLOCK STRIKES 13, AND DONALD TRUMP BECOMES PRESIDENT

In time for coverage of Donald Trump’s inauguration, The Intercept present their own inauguration in the form of a new weekly podcast, Intercepted. In particular the discussion with Naomi Klein about the Women’s march and activism in response to Trump’s presidency is a highlight.

THESE ARE THE DEFIANT "WATER PROTECTORS" OF STANDING ROCK

Perhaps the most integral symbol of defiance in the Western world today is the on-going protest at Standing Rock, which thanks to the Executive Order signed last week has now entered the Trump era, reversing Obama’s empathetic intervention. This superb National Geographic piece profiles the “protectors”.

MOST POPULAR

A few of the most popular recommendations on Cureditor this week.

CHINA MIEVILLE

“The Surrealists were obsessed with games and played them unceasingly—even as the world crumbled and closed in around them.” The erudite, China Mieville, here references surrealism, video games, maps and Weird Fiction along the way in a super interview.


 

LISTEN: A NEUROSCIENTIST EXPLAINS... HOW MUSIC AFFECTS THE BRAIN

A new Guardian podcast from a public neuroscientist, Dr Daniel Glaser, who will be looking at what neuroscience explains about people and culture, and he starts with a look at the effects of music on the brain, speaking to neuroscientists and psychologists to find out.


 

SIGN LANGUAGE'S ANTI-AUTHORITARIAN STREAK

“The continued resistance of President Pea-Brain.” A very interesting description of a form of resistance and humour in American Sign Language that wittily, with a twist of the wrist and facial expression, transforms the sign for ‘Government’ to the sign for ‘pea-brain’.

LISTEN: THE URBANIST – OUT OF THE BOX

Four examples of eccentric and divisive architecture is profiled by Monocle’s The Urbanist team, they visit Yugsolavia, Alicante, Hong Kong and Paris’ Pompidou Centre. In that visit to Paris they look at buildings which often cause controversy in their provocation to the classical architecture of cities.

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