Copy
Must reads, hot topics, most popular...
View this email in your browser

The Week In Context: OCTOBER 1ST, 2016

MUST READS OF THE WEEK

HOW ARTISTS ARE FIGHTING BACK AGAINST THE FASHION INDUSTRY'S PLAGIARISM PROBLEM

“There’s no system in place, no checks and balances, to vet the intellectual property rights of the final product because it goes out the door.” A very interesting investigation into many fashion brands’ intentional and unintentional plagiarism of artists and the legal battles against them.

VOYAGES: VISUAL JOURNEYS BY SIX PHOTOGRAPHERS

The New York Times
A tremendous photography feature from the New York Times’ magazine that takes 6 incredible photographers’ journeys from around the world. Included is David Maurice Smith’s exceptional photography on a tour of a barren 1,200km stretch of southern Australia, and Sebastian Liste’s breathtaking black and white photography of a trek to Machu Picchu.

 

HOW MOVIES HANDLE BIPOLAR DISORDER

“Most movies about bipolar wind up making the illness look attractive because they don’t honestly show what it’s like to cycle between the ups and downs—and deal with the damage you accrue in between.” A sensitive portrayal and excellent round-up of films that portray bipolar disorder, displaying society’s residual stigma in the process.

 

PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE AGE OF COMMUNICATIVE CAPITALISM

Discover – Something by a publisher new to Cureditor this week.
Ben Burbridge
Public Private Secret

“I has become the commodity we spend most of our lives producing. In real-time. Around the clock.” Sit yourself down for some deep thinking on photography in relation to the self as a consumer and the consumed, penned accessibly from art history lecturer, Ben Burbridge.

HOT TOPIC

WALLS OF DIVISION

Barely a week goes by without a mention of a wall to solve the anxieties or ills of a nation. From Trump's mexican border to the UK's migrant wall in Calais, many have come to the conclusion that out of sight is out of mind and that we can merely distance ourselves from all that scares us. But what has history taught us about this tactic? Where's the learning from the Berlin wall, Israel's separation barrier or Detroit's Eight Mile wall? Where's the desire to crumble the wall within our heads rather than to assemble one between us.

AGAINST THE WALL: FROM MEXICO TO CALAIS, WHY THE IDEA OF DIVISION IS TAKING HOLD

Of all the articles in this week’s hot topic, this captures the most the idea of physical protected borders symbolising the internal walls of the communities that are separated by it. It highlights the need to travel, to expose oneself to alternative ways of life and to realise we’re really not that different.

MYTH AND REASON ON THE MEXICAN BORDER

The writings of Paul Theroux are always worth the time. This time he captures the slow burn of the resurgence of nationhood, which in Donald Trump’s mind takes the form of a walled border with Mexico. In response, Theroux travels the length of the border and finds both pride and organised crime.

LIFE ALONG THE BERLIN WALL

A super photo essay of images taken in 1986, three years before the wall fell. As the article describes they reflect “the resigned sense of normalcy around a barrier that many feared would stand for another 25 years or more.”

THE EPIC 450-MILE FRENCH BARRIER THAT COULDN'T STOP THE NAZIS

If extreme nationalists bothered to look back into the history of wall building he would find a dismal picture. Photographer, Alexandre Guirkinger has been beautifully capturing one of those failed projects, the French fortifications that were meant to prevent Nazi attacks in the 1940s.

MOST POPULAR

A few of the most popular recommendations on Cureditor this week.

BACK TO NATURE

Excellent longform from Curbed that looks at modern design through the prism of our concerns about the environment. “The plants, in this case, become a beautiful, unruly introduction to our fate as a civilization overtaken by the nature that we once sought to shape and control.”


 

LIFE ALONG THE BERLIN WALL

A super photo essay of images taken in 1986, three years before the wall fell. As the article describes they reflect “the resigned sense of normalcy around a barrier that many feared would stand for another 25 years or more.”


 

CINE VARDA UTOPIA

The latest of Reverse Shot’s (the publication of the Museum of the Moving Image) feature Symposium began last week and focuses on the work of film director Agnes Varda. The symposium runs until October 22nd and so far features articles on three of her films.

SOUND THE ALARM: NICOLAS JAAR AND THE POLITICS OF DANCE MUSIC

An interesting interview with Nicolas Jaar following the release of his new album yesterday, and how is music is increasingly becoming connected to he and his family’s history in Chile and in politics more generally.

View previous Week in Contexts
Twitter
Twitter
Website
Website
Copyright © 2016 Cureditor, All rights reserved.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp