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The Week In Context: OCTOBER 29TH, 2016

MUST READS OF THE WEEK

HOW POLICE CENSORSHIP SHAPED HOLLYWOOD

“Driven by the need for drama and excitement, Hollywood used genres such as action movies and reality shows to glamorize the very ideas about policing that have generated division in the US.” A super article that looks into the complex relationship between film and the police, in its representation of law and order to its collaboration.

BUCK TO THE FUTURE

Samanth Subramanian
Aeon
With the subheading: ‘What can we learn from Bucky Fuller’s faith in technology?’ Indian writer, Samanth Subramanian explores the philosophical legacy of the ingenious and radical creator and designer Buckminster Fuller and finds that our faith in technology as a source of salvation not destruction is apparent in the technological boom of today.

 

A BOOK BY ITS COVER

Anthropodermic bibliopegy, or books bound in human skin, is the fascinating subject of this essay at Lapham’s Quarterly for their autumn issue, Flesh. Megan Rosenbloom finds a lot of conjecture and rumour but some macabre and sometimes erotic rumours at that.

 

MASCULINITY IN HIP-HOP: A CONVERSATION WITH JESSE

Discover – Something by a publisher new to Cureditor this week
Jesse Bernard
94/5

“Fans may think their favourite rapper is breaking hyper-masculinity boundaries but lyrically Drake is still a misogynist.” An interesting discussion with writer Jesse Bernard at new blog 94/5. The article considers black masculinity as portrayed in hip-hop and whether different hip-hop representations of the male gender stand a chance.

HOT TOPIC

INTERNET ART

The news that most peaked my interest this week is that MoMA will be exhibiting the original Emoji designs in their art collection. It's hard to know if it's just a publicity attempt to appeal to the masses but yet it marks how internet culture has transformed art from a practice of the elite to a democratised process, especially now digital tools allow it to be made and disseminated quickly and cheaply. This week, we point you in the direction of discussions of internet art, from its earliest examples and the attempts to preserve them, to the trends within social media that are art subcultures within themselves.

PLEASE TURN ON YOUR PHONE IN THE MUSEUM

Dealing directly with the democratisation of space and the liberalisation of museum policy this article provides a neat overview of some of the changes we have seen by major museum and galleries to include digital art in their repertoire and to bring art out of the galleries and into our devices.

THE MISSION TO SAVE VANISHING INTERNET ART

A piece that highlights the work of Rhizome in preserving the early forms of internet art that has since been taken down or removed. The article also looks at the context of the internet art movement that got people thinking that it “might even do away with traditional institutions and gatekeepers.”

MUSE FEED

Another super article from the online magazine we featured a couple of weeks’ back, Real Life. This one explores the subculture of “weird Facebook”, a collection of bizarre image macros created in a David Lynch sort of way. For this writer “Facebook has produced a new kind of artist.”

JENNICAM: THE FIRST WOMAN TO STREAM HER LIFE ON THE INTERNET

To accompany BBC radio’s latest Digital Human episode, presenter Aleks Krotoski pens an article on Jennifer Ringley, who in 1996 utilised the beginnings of digital streaming technology to produce a continuous “life casting” that ran for 7 years displaying everything that happened in her room, however intimate. Aleks explores her experiment.

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

 

GUEST CURATOR, PAMELA HUTCHINSON

Pamela is a journalist and film critic based in London with a particular interest in silent cinema and the silent film era. This week she recommended some excellent articles, on topics including classic movie streaming, 1920s fashion and a celebration of female film critics.

MOST POPULAR

A few of the most popular recommendations on Cureditor this week.

THE PHOTOGRAPHER EXPOSING MISOGYNY'S INSIDIOUS ROOTS

“Every stage of a girl’s coming of age is marked by normalised violence.” Poulomi Basu sensitively portrays life in India where ritualistically women are conditioned to serve, revere and be controlled by men. As well as this is her superb photography of her travels to expose such conditioning and injustice.


 

THE AGE OF STREAMING IS KILLING CLASSIC FILM

Guest Curator Pamela Hutchinson: “This article has caused a lot of debate. Its central argument is spot-on though: it is harder these days to do what I did in the late 90s and “accidentally evolve into a film buff”. Streaming services, and online film journalism, should offer curation as well as choice.”


 

FOPS AND FLAPPERS: WILD FASHIONS OF THE 1920S

Guest curator, Pamela Hutchinson: “The pictures in this gallery are gorgeous and fairly risqué. The people in them are all worth finding more about, too. Valentino, Astaire and Louise Brooks are well known, but the stories of Gilda Gray, Bessie Love, the Dolly Sisters etc are compelling too.”

A BOOK BY ITS COVER

Anthropodermic bibliopegy, or books bound in human skin, is the fascinating subject of this essay at Lapham’s Quarterly for their autumn issue, Flesh. Megan Rosenbloom finds a lot of conjecture and rumour but some macabre and sometimes erotic rumours at that.


 

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