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NNRG Newsletter | March 2020

WOMEN IN THE WOODS

DIRECTOR'S MESSAGE


March is National Women’s Month. In honor of that I would like to recognize the significant and growing role of women in managing forests across the Northwest. 

Over the past several years I’ve worked with an increasing number of women who are the primary managers and decision makers for their family’s forest. I’ve also noticed that at least half the professional forestry community I work within, from private consulting foresters to scientists with public agencies to staff of conservation groups, is now composed of women. In fact, the last three foresters NNRG hired (and indeed more than half of NNRG’s staff and half of our Board of Directors) are women. This is a passionate, committed, brilliant and hardworking community of people who inspire and edify me daily. 

But of all of these leaders and doers, there is one woman of such indefatigable courage and drive that I must call her out: my Mom.

Hi Mom. At 86, when she’s not traveling the world, she’s hefting logs off forest roads, cutting blackberry away from tree seedlings, planting trees, pruning, and following her curiosity all over our family’s 200 acres of forestland in Western Washington. She truly demonstrates that it is one’s will, not one’s age and certainly not one’s gender, that should limit an individual from achieving their aspirations. 

To all of the amazing women in the forestry community – thank you for what you do!

Kirk Hanson
Director of Forestry
(360) 316-9317
kirk@nnrg.org

P.S. Don't forget to let us know right here when you're seeing Douglas-fir bud break in your area!
Ma Hansen.

WORDS FROM THE WOODS

In this section we’ll pose a question related to forestry or forest practices, and collect the responses in the next newsletter. We ask that you keep your story short (50 to 250 words) and colorful. Feel free to submit photos or links to web-hosted video or blogs with your story. 

Have you noticed ways in which gender influences your experience in forestry? 

 
Submit answer

UPDATES FROM NNRG

Women in the Woods: Then and Now

We've come a long way. There's still more to do. 

Women are doing more research on forests, more fieldwork in forests, and making more decisions for forests than they ever have.

From the first woman field officer employed by the U.S. Forest Service ― whose presence in the applicant pool tested the sensibilities of the male hiring manager ―  to the women woodland owners we work with and the networks that support them, we took a look at what it's like to be a woman in the world of forestry. Spoiler alert: there's no consensus of opinion!


Read more on NNRG's blog.

Meet NNRG Forester Marcia Rosenquist!

Marcia joined NNRG's forestry team in January of this year. We're lucky to have her on board!
 
Marcia grew up in the Pacific Northwest. After receiving her B.S. in Environmental Science and Resource Management from the University of Washington, she spent some time behind a corporate desk before returning to the university to earn a Master of Forest Resources. After graduating, she worked as a consulting arborist and, as an ISA Certified Arborist and ISA Qualified Tree Risk Assessor, brings a unique perspective to ecological forestry within the urban-wildland interface.

Read our interview with Marcia on NNRG's blog! 

The Not-So-Open Road

Road Decommissioning at Ellsworth Creek Preserve

In forest systems, hydrology and road systems are at odds with one another. Water wants to run down slopes and avoid barriers, while roads cut across slopes and aim to stay put. Managing your road system to minimize erosion and runoff takes forethought and more than a bit of careful engineering.

Kyle Smith, the Forest Manager for The Nature Conservancy of Washington, is a self-described road engineering geek and has taken great care in consolidating and updating the road system at Ellsworth Creek Preserve. Over the last fifteen years, twenty-five miles of roads have been decommissioned at the Ellsworth Creek Preserve, and TNC has built seven miles of well-drained roads along the watershed’s ridgeline. 


Read more about road decommissioning at Ellsworth Creek Preserve and watch a neat time-lapse of the work.

UPCOMING EVENTS


Rural Living Day 2020
March 7 | Junction City

Women of Forestry: Lecture Series
March 16 - May 27 | Corvallis

Tour of Mass Plywood Panel Plant
March 11 | Lyons

Weyerhauser Seedling Sale
March 14 | Aurora

Tree School 2020 - Clackamas
March 21 | Oregon City

International Mass Timber Conference
March 24-26 | Portland

Managing to Keep Forests Healthy in the Future
April 9 | Molalla

NEWS

OSU Pollinator Survey. OSU's Forestry and Natural Resources Extension program is conducting a survey to identify small woodland owner educational needs and interests around forest pollinators. They will use the results to identify what types of workshops and resources to develop on pollinators. 
How Seashells Feed Trees. You might well understand how nutrients from salmon nourish forests in the Pacific Northwest. Researchers are turning their attention to seashells, transported into forests by gulls, otters, bears, raccoons, and humans, as another source of calcium and other minerals. 
How Native Tribes Are Taking the Lead on Planning for Climate Change. From Yale Environment 360, "With their deep ties to the land [...] indigenous tribes are especially vulnerable to climate change. Native communities across North America are stepping up to adopt climate action plans to protect their way of life."
Seattle City Light Hopes New Forest Better Prepared for Climate Change. Great coverage from King 5 on a project NNRG is working on with The Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, Seattle City Light, and Seattle Public Utilities. Check out this article to learn more about climate-adapted reforestation at Stossel Creek!
Tropical Forests Losing Their Ability to Absorb Carbon, Study Finds. Disappointing, perhaps not surprising, news about forests to the south: "Tropical forests are taking up less carbon dioxide from the air, reducing their ability to act as 'carbon sinks' and bringing closer the prospect of accelerating climate breakdown."
The Mystery of Mountain Lions. From High Country News, an interesting read on the mythology around the elusive mountain lions of the west. "The mythologizing cuts both ways. Without direct contact, it’s as easy to revere cougars as harmless avatars of nature as it is to cast them as monsters."

RESOURCES ON FUNDING FOREST STEWARDSHIP

Establishing a healthy forest doesn't have to mean breaking the bank. Below we list a few of the funding resources available to forest owners in Washington and Oregon for forest stewardship activities. A more complete list can be found on NNRG's website. 
 

Funding in Oregon

  • Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) – ODF can help landowners with a minimum of 10 acres develop a forest management plan by providing up to 75% cost-share reimbursement through their Forest Stewardship Program.
  • EQIP funding for forest management plans & forest health activities – EQIP helps forest owners access technical expertise to develop and complete conservation practices that improve the health and productivity of their land. It can provide funding for landowners to hire a forestry consultant (they call them Technical Service Providers) to develop management plans.
  • Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board – Provides grants to help protect and restore healthy watersheds and natural habitats that support thriving communities and strong economies.
  • Agricultural Conservation Easement Program – The Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) provides financial and technical assistance to help conserve agricultural lands and wetlands and their related benefits.
  • Conservation Stewardship Program – The Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) offers an opportunity for forestland managers to enhance their agricultural operations while adopting conservation activities that can improve crop quality, improve soil health, and improve water quality. 


Funding in Washington

  • EQIP funding for forest management plans & forest health activities – EQIP helps forest owners access technical expertise to develop and complete conservation practices that improve the health and productivity of their land. It can provide funding for landowners to hire a forestry consultant (they call them Technical Service Providers) to develop management plans. The Washington deadline for EQIP 2020 funding is April 3!
  • Conservation Stewardship Program – The Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) offers an opportunity for forestland managers to enhance their agricultural operations while adopting conservation activities that can improve crop quality, improve soil health, and improve water quality. 
  • Agricultural Conservation Easement Program – The Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) provides financial and technical assistance to help conserve agricultural lands and wetlands and their related benefits.
  • Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (WA) – The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) is a joint federal and state funded program that restores streamside habitat for salmon and protects that habitat for 10-15 years. CREP plants native trees and shrubs to improve stream conditions and enhance wetlands along salmon streams. All of the costs for these improvements are paid by the program.
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