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January 21st

Antigua Barbuda Moves

Featured

Climate Change and NCDs in the Caribbean

Climate Change and NCDs in the Caribbean
(L to R) Dr. Georgiana Gordon-Strachan, Programme Coordinator for the Pilot Programme for Climate Resilience, Caribbean, UWI, Hon. Lt Col. Jeffrey Bostic, Minister of Health and  Wellness, Barbados, Sir Trevor Hassell, President, HCC, Dr Nick Watts, Executive Director, Lancet Countdown, Dr. James Fletcher, SOLORICON, Dr. Joy St. John, Executive Director, Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) and Dr. Carlene Radix, HCC Director
In August 2019, the HCC was invited to represent the Caribbean as one of the priority countries/regions of the Lancet Countdown over the period 2019-2023 based on the region’s extreme vulnerabilities to climate change. As a participating priority region, the HCC hosted the first Lancet Countdown Launch Event in the Caribbean to officially launch the 2019 Report. The event Climate Change and NCDs in the Caribbean, the Caribbean launch of the 2019 Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change Report, took place at the Radisson Aquatica Hotel, Barbados on Thursday December 19th following  the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) 25th Conference of Parties (COP) negotiations which was held this year in Madrid, Spain from December 2nd - 13th.
The Hon. Lt Col. Jeffrey Bostic
The Hon. Lt Col. Jeffrey Bostic, Minister of Health and  Wellness, Barbados
Dr Nick Watts
Dr Nick Watts, Executive Director, Lancet Countdown
The invited guests and assembled media listened intently to the presentations made by the distinguished array of speakers, Dr Carlene Radix, HCC Director gave some background to the report, the Hon. Lt Col. Jeffrey Bostic, Minister of Health and  Wellness, Barbados, gave his high level remarks, presentations followed from Dr. James Fletcher of SOLORICON, Dr. Joy St. John, Executive Director, Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA), Dr. Georgiana Gordon-Strachan, Programme Coordinator for the Pilot Programme for Climate Resilience, Caribbean, UWI and finally Dr Nick Watts, Executive Director, Lancet Countdown who presented the The Lancet Countdown 2019 Report.
"When we think of climate change, we talk about hurricanes, fires, sea-level rise and ocean acidification, but often do not think about health impacts, not only in terms of diseases but also the ability of small island developing states to deliver health care services properly owing to the impact of these events"

Hon. Lt Col. Jeffrey Bostic, Minister of Health and  Wellness, Barbados
Dr Nick Watts, Executive Director, Lancet Countdown
Dr Nick Watts, Executive Director, Lancet Countdown (right) presenting Sir Trevor Hassell with a copy of the 2019 Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change Report
Dr. Joy St. John
Dr. Joy St. John, Executive Director, Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA)
"If sea levels rise by one metre, the Caribbean would lose 1,300 square kilometres of its land space, equivalent to Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and Anguilla. It would displace 110,000 people, destroy 149 tourist resorts, most of which are on the coast of our islands, five powerplants, 21 airports in the CARICOM region, and 567 square kilometres of roads"

Dr. James Fletcher, SOLORICON
The invited guests and assembled media listened intently to the presentations made by the distinguished array of speakers, Dr Carlene Radix, HCC Director gave some background to the report, the Hon. Lt Col. Jeffrey Bostic, Minister of Health and  Wellness, Barbados, gave his high level remarks, presentations followed from Dr. James Fletcher of SOLORICON, Dr. Joy St. John, Executive Director, Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA), Dr. Georgiana Gordon-Strachan, Programme Coordinator for the Pilot Programme for Climate Resilience, Caribbean, UWI and finally Dr Nick Watts, Executive Director, Lancet Countdown who presented the The Lancet Countdown 2019 Report.

For more information, a video recording of the event, presentation slides and photographs click/tap on the button below.
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Caribbean Alcohol Reduction Day (CARD) 2019

Video recording, presentation slides and infographics now available
Video recording of the 4th Caribbean Alcohol Reduction Day (CARD)
Webinar: Women and Alcohol
On Friday December 6th the HCC with the support of partners PAHO and CARPHA, hosted the 4th Annual Caribbean Alcohol Reduction Day the theme was Women and Alcohol, alcohol affects men and women differently, giving rise to unique gender-based vulnerabilities. 

Alcohol use not only increases a woman’s risk of liver and cardiovascular diseases, cancer and assault, but consumption of alcohol during pregnancy increases the risk of miscarriage, stillbirth, premature deliveries, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Alcohol use is also linked to breast cancer among women. Historically, alcohol use and its consequential health issues are more prevalent in men than in women. However, emerging evidence reveals an epidemiological change in alcohol use in younger cohorts, and further demonstrates that women suffer with more severe health and social problems at the hands of alcohol. Further, alcohol metabolism occurs differently in women due to differences in body structure and chemistry, leading to greater absorption of alcohol and delayed excretion. The risk of an alcohol injury is higher for women than men after about 3 drinks, with an exponential increase in risk in any injury, including road injuries.
Predictions for 2030 if no action is taken
Health Impacts of Alcohol
A recording of the CARD 2019 webinar along with presentation slides and a set of four infographics can be found on our dedicated webpage by tapping/clicking the button below.
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News

Sugary Beverages Are Feeding a Childhood Obesity Epidemic in the Caribbean

Sugary Beverages Are Feeding a Childhood Obesity Epidemic in the Caribbean
Photo: Getty
Forbes: Rainbow-coloured drinks with tropical names and fruit-inspired flavours are the beverage of choice for many children in the Caribbean. But happy neon tongues and adorable food dyed lips disguise a public health crisis that is anything but cute. With a single serving of sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs) exceeding the World Health Organisation’s daily-recommended maximum sugar intake, and in a region where there are more soft drinks consumed than anywhere else in the world, SSBs have been linked to the Caribbean’s deadly childhood obesity epidemic.

“The Caribbean exhibits some of the highest rates of childhood obesity globally,” says Maisha Hutton, Executive Director of the Healthy Caribbean Coalition, a Caribbean Non-Communicable Diseases alliance of over 100 organisations. “One in every three Caribbean children is obese and at risk for developing non-communicable diseases including diabetes, hypertension and heart disease.”
Read more
The Healthy Caribbean Coalition CSO Regional Action Team for Childhood Obesity Prevention has produced a series of infographics, Sweet Beverages in the Caribbean Infographic Series: How much sugar is in your beverage? This infographic series is an update of the 2016 HCC Sugar In The Caribbean Infographic Series which showed the sugar content of some sweet beverages available locally.  
How Much Sugar is in Your Beverage? Sweet Beverages in the Caribbean
The consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs) is one of the major contributors to the obesity epidemic among adults and children. In the Caribbean on average data shows that 1 in 3 children is overweight or obese. The sugar content of one serving of many popular carbonated beverages and juices far exceeds the entire daily healthy maximum sugar intake for adults and children as recommended by the WHO and the American Heart Association (AHA).

This infographic series is intended to be an educational, awareness raising tool which provides a snapshot of the sugar content of some of the drinks available in eight Caribbean islands: Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia and Trinidad and Tobago.
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Raising Mental Health Awareness in Barbados

Raising Mental Health Awareness in Barbados
(Image: Barbados Today Website)
The public will have an opportunity for their questions on mental health to be answered.

Starting in February, two organizations will host video and podcast educational sessions on the most important aspects of mental health.

SHE and Butterfly aim to provide information on mental health protocols in the Barbadian cultural context. They will provide specific information on where to go if help is needed and why mental health matters.
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Diet Soda May Be Hurting Your Diet

Diet Soda May Be Hurting Your Diet
(Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash)
Jamaica Observer: Artificial sweeteners are everywhere, but the jury is still out on whether these chemicals are harmless.

Also called non-nutritive sweeteners, these can be synthetic - such as saccharin and aspartame - or naturally derived, such as steviol, which comes from the stevia plant. To date, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved six types of artificial and two types of natural non-nutritive sweeteners for use in food.

That's been great news for those working hard to curb their sugar consumption. Aspartame, for example, is found in more than 6,000 foods worldwide, and about 5,000-5,500 tons are consumed every year in the United States alone.
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Heart Foundation of Jamaica Targets 5,000 Participants for RFYH 5K, 2K

Heart Foundation Targets 5,000 Participants for Rfyh 5K, 2K
Photo: Jamaica Observer
Jamaica Observer: The Heart Foundation of Jamaica (HFJ), in partnership with Crystal Spring water and Running Events Jamaica, will stage the fourth edition of the Run For Your Heart (RFYH) 5K and 2K on Sunday, February 2, 2020 at Emancipation Park with a 7:00 am race start.

“We want to keep the message of heart health at the top of minds beyond the start of a new year to everyday,” noted Karen Anderson, senior manager, marketing & fund development.

Heart disease remains the number one killer in Jamaica and across the globe.
Read more

Twice As Many Bajan Men as Women Use Alcohol As Their Drug of Choice

Twice As Many Bajan Men as Women Use Alcohol As Their Drug of Choice
Photo: Loop News Website
Loop News: The National Council on Substance Abuse (NCSA) is fully on board with the Healthy Caribbean Coalition's push to work on addressing the use of alcohol by women and girls in Barbados especially, considering the picture statistics are painting.

The Barbados Drug Information Network (BARDIN) reports consistently show that alcohol is one of the top three drugs for which persons seek assistance from our local substance abuse treatment centres.

This statistic is but one reason why the Healthy Caribbean Coalition (HCC) closed off 2019 with a focus on alcohol use, especially among females. 

The Caribbean Alcohol Reduction Day (CARD) 2019 at the end of last year put women, alcohol and the unique public health and Non-Communicable Diseases (NCD) linked to alcohol consumption among women under the microscope.
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WHO: 13 Urgent Health Challenges for the Next Decade

Photo: UNICEF
As a new year and a new decade kick off, WHO is releasing a list of urgent, global health challenges. This list, developed with input from our experts around the world, reflects a deep concern that leaders are failing to invest enough resources in core health priorities and systems. This puts lives, livelihoods and economies in jeopardy. None of these issues are simple to address, but they are within reach. Public health is ultimately a political choice.

We need to realize that health is an investment in the future. Countries invest heavily in protecting their people from terrorist attacks, but not against the attack of a virus, which could be far more deadly, and far more damaging economically and socially. A pandemic could bring economies and nations to their knees. Which is why health security cannot be a matter for ministries of health alone.
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Obesity Isn’t an Unstoppable Trend - Here’s What We Can Do Differently

Obesity Isn’t an Unstoppable Trend - Here’s What We Can Do Differently
Photo: Peter Wendt, Unsplash
World Economic Forum: If we want to turn the tide on the global crisis of childhood obesity, we’ll need to use "whole of society" approaches to build healthier food environments.

The global increase in obesity among children can feel like an unstoppable trend – the inevitable consequence of a shift away from traditional diets and lifestyles; of growing access to cheap, calorie dense, nutrient-poor, hyper-palatable foods. But, while addressing the issue represents a major and complex challenge, a growing body of evidence and experience is pointing to solutions that could work. And governments, business and civil society are starting to pay attention.
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Lake Health and Wellbeing Newsletter

Lake Health and Wellbeing Newsletter
In this edition:
  • HCC's launch of their Sweet Beverages in the Caribbean Infographic Series
  • New Healthy Kids SKN initiative
  • NCD Prevention and Control Forum which was held recently in St Kitts, share our excitement about receiving a
  • Grant from the Soca Girls Rock team and provide some information on the
  • Launch of SKN Moves.
Read more

Young Diabetes Ambassador Receives Training in South Korea

Young Diabetes Ambassador Receives Training in South Korea
President of the Diabetes Association of Barbados, Trudy Griffith (left) with Ambassador Melissa Goodman (centre) and Republic Bank Manager, Marketing and Corporate Communications, Sophia Allsopp Cambridge.
Photo: Barbados Advocate
Barbados Advocate: Barbados was represented at the Young Leaders in Diabetes Training Summit, which took place in Busan, South Korea from December 2nd to 6th.

Diabetes Ambassador Mellissa Goodman attended the annual Summit, where she received Diabetes Awareness training on behalf of the Diabetes Association of Barbados.

President of the Diabetes Association, Trudy Griffith, said the trip was funded by the Association with assistance from sponsor, Republic Bank. Griffith said it serves as part of Melissa’s preparation for her ongoing role as a youth ambassador for diabetes awareness in Barbados.
Read more

Sugar Tax Is Working: Britons’ Consumption of Sugar Has Dropped by a Teaspoon a Day Since Tax on Sweetened Drinks Was Launched

Sugar Tax Is Working
Photo: Anthony Devlin
UK Daily Mail: Britons’ consumption of sugar in drinks has dropped by more than a teaspoon per person each day due to the ‘sugar tax’, a major study has found.

Since 2015 the sugar in soft drinks sold in the UK has dropped by 30 per cent - equivalent to a daily reduction of 4.6g per person.

That is the equivalent of cutting out more than one teaspoon of sugar each day. The Oxford University researchers behind the study credited the soft drinks levy for the reduction.
Read more

Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax
Image: World Obesity Federation
World Obesity Federation’s One-Stop-Shop on All Things Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Taxes.
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NCDs at a Glance: NCD Mortality and Risk Factor Prevalence in the Americas

NCDs at a Glance
PAHO: Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), principally cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, and chronic respiratory diseases, are the leading causes of death, and are responsible for approximately 80% of all deaths in the Region of the Americas. NCDs can be prevented through reduction of their main risk factors, namely tobacco use, harmful use of alcohol, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity. Premature deaths from NCDs can be mitigated through timely disease detection, treatment and care. The NCD agenda has been expanded beyond this concept of four diseases and four risk factors.

Mental health is now included in the global NCD agenda, and air pollution, globally recognized as a significant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic respiratory diseases, is now included as the fifth NCD risk factor. This document considers the 5x5 NCD agenda and presents a snapshot of data on NCDs and risk factors for the Region of the Americas, for each category of disease and risk factor, by sex and for the 35 Member States of the Pan American Health Organization. It is intended to provide a visual snapshot of the current status of NCD mortality and risk factor prevalence and convey the significance of the burden of NCDs throughout the Region.
Download/Read the Report

HCC Technical Brief and Eight Advocacy Priorities

HCC Technical Brief:
HCC Technical Brief: First United Nations High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage: Technical Brief for CARICOM Countries - A Contribution from Civil Society.
Read download
HCC Advocacy Priorities
HCC Advocacy Priorities for the United Nations High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage.
Read/download

HCC Childhood Obesity Prevention Policies

Childhood Obesity Prevention policies
Childhood Obesity Prevention policies
We have created social media graphics to campaign for the implementation of our Childhood Obesity Prevention Policies. The graphics can be downloaded here.
Childhood Obesity Prevention Scorecard
NCD Alliance

Newsletter

In this edition:
  • Inspiring actions - announcing ENOUGH. Campaign Fuel Awardees
  • Egyptian NCD Alliance supports national awareness campaign
  • Less than a month until the 3rd Global NCDA Forum
  • Last weeks to participate in WHO Health for All Film Festival
  • New name & new logo for IOGT International, same purpose
Read more

Please Help to Monitor the Health of Caribbean Schools

MHCS
My Healthy Caribbean School (MHCS) is an initiative of the HCC which provides students, teachers and parents with the opportunity to monitor the school environment with a focus on nutrition and physical activity.
Find out more

Key Messages From Our Publications

NCDs - Context and Situation Summary

Taken from: First United Nations High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage: Technical Brief for CARICOM Countries – A Contribution from Civil Society
NCDs - Context and Situation Summary
Read more
Our Publications
CARD 2019: Women and Alcohol
CARD 2019: Women and Alcohol
A set of infographics
Read more
Call to Urgent Action
Call to Urgent Action - Infographics and Social Media Visuals
Read more
See All HCC Publications
Forthcoming Events

Faces of Cancer St. Lucia Calendar of Events 2020

Faces of Cancer St Lucia
Read more

February 2020

CSS PSA Testing
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The HCC is a regional network of Caribbean health NGOs and civil society organizations with the remit to combat chronic diseases (NCDs) and their associated risk factors and conditions. Our membership presently consists of more than 65 Caribbean-based health NGOs and over 55 not-for-profit organisations and, in excess of 200 individual members based in the Caribbean and across the globe.

To join the HCC email us at hcc@healthycaribbean.org
The work of HCC would not be possible without core funding from Sagicor Life Inc
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The HCC promote the work of civil society throughout the Caribbean in a variety of ways including sharing of their materials, this is not an endorsement of their materials or messages. The information contained in this newsletter is for general information purposes only, we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct but any reliance you place on such information is strictly at your own risk. Through this newsletter you are able to link to other websites which are not under the control of the HCC. We have no control over the nature, content and availability of those sites. The inclusion of any links does not necessarily imply a recommendation or endorse the views expressed within them.
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