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Today: CIA's secret art, Israeli nukes, the soul of the interrogator, Fairey's Paris

Welcome to @TheNewsNomad

A daily list of news and views that excite the imagination.

Curated by
James Porteous
23 November 2015

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WELCOME TO @THENEWSNOMAD FOR 23 NOVEMBER 2015

Arnold Mesches, The FBI Files 5 (2001). Image: Courtesy of the artist and Life on Mars Gallery, Brooklyn, New York.
Arnold Mesches, The FBI Files 5 (2001). Image: Courtesy of the artist and Life on Mars Gallery, Brooklyn, New York.

WHY WON'T THE CIA REVEAL THE PAINTINGS IN ITS SECRET ART COLLECTION?

[Art Net News]

"According to a report in SFGate.com, Portland artist Johanna Barron wanted to know more about the 29 Washington Color School paintings hanging on the agency's walls in Virginia, which may include works by artists Gene Davis, Thomas Downing, Morris Louis, Howard Mehring, Kenneth Noland and Paul Reed. But when she tried to obtain additional information about the works—through repeated Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests—she was unsettled by repeated denials to what she believed to be simple appeals..."

The Negev Nuclear Research Center in Dimona. (Screen capture: YouTube, via Channel 10)
The Negev Nuclear Research Center in Dimona. (Screen capture: YouTube, via Channel 10)

ISRAEL HAS 115 NUCLEAR WEAPONS, SAYS US THINK TANK

[Times of Israel]

"The Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS) published a report on November 19 alleging that Israel possesses about 660 kilograms of plutonium, produced at the Dimona reactor since operations began in 1963, which would allow it to have an estimated 115 nuclear weapons today." 

"Since the 1960s when Israel developed the nuclear-capable Jericho ballistic missile with France’s help, it has developed “several improved missiles since then on its own, as well as nuclear-capable cruise missiles,” according to Albright who added that Israel “also has aircraft that can deliver nuclear weapons and “may have the capability to launch nuclear-tipped cruise missiles from its submarines.”

 

KEEP IT IN THE GROUND

[The Guardian]

‘Our melting, shifting, liquid world’: celebrities read poems on climate change. James Franco, Ruth Wilson, Gabriel Byrne, Maxine Peake, Jeremy Irons, Kelly Macdonald and Michael Sheen read a series of 21 poems on the theme of climate change, curated by UK poet laureate Carol Ann Duffy. 

Original caption: 20 Jan 1968, Da Nang, Vietnam. First Air Cavalrymen and a Vietnamese interpreter lay a towel over the face on an uncooperative Viet Cong suspect and then pour water on it. Photo by Bettmann/Corbis
Original caption: 20 Jan 1968, Da Nang, Vietnam. First Air Cavalrymen and a Vietnamese interpreter lay a towel over the face on an uncooperative Viet Cong suspect and then pour water on it. Photo by Bettmann/Corbis

THE INTERROGATOR’S SOUL

[Aeon]

"Most people assume that torturing another human being is something only a minority are capable of doing. Waterboarding requires the use of physical restraints – perhaps only after a physical struggle – unless the captive willingly submits to the process. Slapping or hitting another person, imposing extremes of temperature, electrocuting them, requires active others who must grapple with, and perhaps subdue, the captive, imposing levels of physical contact that violate all norms of interpersonal interaction.

"Torturing someone is not easy, and subjecting a fellow human being to torture is stressful for all but the most psychopathic. In None of Us Were Like This Before (2010), the journalist Joshua Phillips recounts the stories of American soldiers in Iraq who turned to prisoner abuse, torment and torture. Once removed from the theatre of war and the camaraderie of the battalion, intense, enduring and disabling guilt, post-traumatic stress disorder, and substance abuse follow. Suicide is not uncommon..."

SHEPARD FAIREY’S “EARTH CRISIS” EIFFEL TOWER INTERVENTION

[BLOUINART]

Shepard Fairey has unveiled his latest work at the Eiffel Tower in Paris and it’s quite the spectacle. Titled “Earth Crisis,” the giant 8 meter diameter, 2.3 ton globe is suspended 60 meters above the ground between the Eiffel Tower’s first and second floor.




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James Porteous 

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