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Magnolia Newsletter (#70)  (Feb 2020)
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Upcoming Events 


 
February 2020

First Wednesday of the Month Social Braai
5  Magnolia Quality Coaching @ Harlequins 16:30/17:00
8  Bronkhorstspruit 32km and 10km
9  Magnolia Club runs starting 06h00
12 Club house day
12 Magnolia Quality Coaching @ Harlequins 16:30/17:00
15 Bestmed Tuks Race 42,2 (pre-entry), 21km, 10km and 5km 
16 Magnolia Club runs starting 06h00
19 Magnolia Quality Coaching @ Harlequins 16:30/17:00
23 NO Magnolia Club Run
23 Phobians Pretoria Marathon, 21km, 10km and 5km fun run
26 Magnolia Quality Coaching @ Harlequins 16:30/17:00
26 Magnolia Comrades build-up : Guest Speakers at the clubhouse
29 Medihelp Sunrise Monster 32km, 21km, 10km and 5km

March 2020
1 Magnolia Club runs starting 06h00
 

Please note  
In 2020 the club house will be open on Wednesdays and not on Tuesdays. 

Wednesdays Club House Day

We encourage members attending the FREE Magnolia Quality Coaching on Wednesdays, to park at the club house and warm-up to the workout @ Harlequins Cricket Field (Where the Sunrise monster race finishes)

Save the date
26 February 2020
Magnolia Clubhouse  @ 18h00
Magnolia will be hosting a talk on dietary requirements and tips as well as injury prevention and management, focusing on Comrades and other ultra races.
The duration of the event is 90 minutes with no entrance fee

Speakers Nicki de Villiers, Lee Collins and Andri Smuts.

(Watch Face Book for more detail – send your questions on the topics before the event to the speakers)
THANK YOU
 

Thank You to Melinda Small and Noel Young for hosting the last club run in January 2020, truly kicking off the club's Comrades training.

Thank you to Tinus Marais and Freddie du Plessis for the helpers run hosted after a very successful Intercare Classic Race, hosted by Magnolia.

That brings us to each and every member that contributed to the success of the Intercare Race. We established the Classic Race as a role player and still relevant in a changing sport. Contributing to the running community being the ultimate goal.
First Wednesday Social Braai

Every first Wednesday of the month Magnolia hosts a very informal social club braai. You are welcome to bring your meat, snacks, friends and the rest of the family for a braai. We provide the fires. Everyone is welcome!!

Our next braai is on 5 February 2020!!!

Time 18:00
Cash bar available
Bring your own cutlery.
 

2020 Magnolia Registration


The 2020 Registration Fees:
  • 1st Adult member: R500
  • 2nd Adult (family): R420
  • Students and under 25's: R270
  • Junior (under 18): R180
  • Great Grand Master (70+): R320
  • Above 80: Free
  • Social member/Friend of Magnolia R270

 

Online registrations are open

Members can register online (preferred method) and pay EFT (preferred) and then when license numbers are ready you'll just need to bring your registration print-out and proof of payment upon collection of your license number.

See http://magnolia.membershipboss.com/  

Race numbers can be collected at the club house on Wednesdays.

Club Tent


Look out for the bright blue club tent on:
  • 8 February  Bronkhorstspruit Race
  • 15 February Bestmed Tuks Race 
  • 23 February Phobians Pretoria Marathon
  • 29 February Medihelp Sunrise Monster

The club tent will be at all Pretoria races on weekends unless specified otherwise. No club tent at races on Wednesdays. 

Cold drinks and snacks are provided by the club.

Beers R15   and Ciders for R20

(On races > 21.1km  Beers/Ciders R10)

Please contact Dirk Olivier 082 787 5097 should you have any queries regarding the club tent.

 

Sunday Runs


The Magnolia Club run start at 06:00.

Please arrive a few minutes early to register for the run to start on time

RUN DATES 2020
9 February 
16 February
23 February - No club Run - Phobians Pretoria Marathon
1 March

LOCATION
Magnolia Club house, 229 Middel Street

Distance             18km - 22km
Cost                    R20


ALL RUNNERS WELCOME!! The Sunday runs are not just for Magnolia members but for the whole running community.
 

Volunteers are needed for the vehicle support runs on: 

    15 March
    24 May
    31 May

 

Magnolia Quality Coaching
 

Speed work is the core of what drives improvement in our running. So Magnolia has joined forces with Clinton Hunter from RacePace Coaching to provide group coaching sessions to all Magnolia members who are interested in improving their running .
These coaching sessions are for old, young, slow and fast.
The professional coaching sessions will be paid for by the club, so it will be free of charge to our members.

When: Wednesdays
Where: Harlequins Cricket Field (Where the Sunrise monster race finishes)
Time: 16:30/17:00 ( You can slot in with any group)


For further information and instruction on how to join read about Race Pace coaching on our website.
http://magnoliaroadrunners.co.za/2017-coaching-for-magnolia-members/


 

Running Clothes


Running vests are sold at the club house on Wednesdays from 17:30-18:30.
  • Men's and ladies vests - R220
  • Cycling vests - R220
Visit the website to view our clothing range http://magnoliaroadrunners.co.za/club-clothing/

 

ASA Details


ALL MAGNOLIA MEMBERS are required to go check their details on the ASA website under the following link: https://asa.saclubs.co.za/register

We still have numerous Magnolia members who have not registered or arranged their transfers from other clubs. We created profiles for some of those members who have not done so. These members can either use their name or ID number as password to log in.

 

 

Social Media

Please visit us on  www.magnoliaroadrunners.co.za
Join our Strava group
Join our Facebook page or follow us on Instagram 

You can also subscribe or unsubscribe to our newsletter.

 

Race Information

  You can also download the following running mobile application for free www.runsa.co.za

 

                                 Contact Us


Chairman: Charl Crouse
082 900 1323
crouse-fam@netactive.co.za      

Club Secretary : Magda Grobler
magdagrobler@webmail.co.za
 
Vice Chairman: Tinus Marais
Tinus.Marais@gijima.com

Club Captain : Gert Henning
gerthenning@yahoo.com

Vice-Club Captain: Freddie du Plessis
dplessfb@gmail.com

Newsletter editor: Hannes Nel
hannes.nel.mail@gmail.com

Website and statistician: Noel Young
website@magnoliaroadrunners.co.za

Clothing: Odette Coiner
ocoiner@gmail.com

Social matters: Estelle Janen van Vuuren
mrsice@icloud.com

Social Media : Werner Burger
wernersburger@yahoo.com


 

Magnolia running statistics are held for races thru-out the year to award the runners that excel in different distances and age groups.

If you ran a race that was not published on Raceresults and you would like the result to be counted, please send the details to website@magnoliaroadrunners.co.za

(The races where Magnolia was represented in numbers like Comrades, Oceans, Om-die-dam and Loskop were counted)


Akasia Wonderpark (AGN) 10km race - 2020-01-25

5 club finishers

Position

Initials

Surname

Sex

Age

Finish Time

67

S

Rossouw

F

49

00:47:51

69

K

Van Zyl

M

16

00:48:09

120

P

Muburg

M

39

00:51:58

597

K

Steinmann

M

50

01:10:05

876

J

Bonnet

   

01:17:21

 

Akasia Wonderpark (AGN) 21km race - 2020-01-25
20 club finishers

Position

Initials

Surname

Sex

Age

Finish Time

37

J

Mcewan

M

53

01:32:39

46

D

Dutton

M

50

01:34:53

138

R

Davel

M

36

01:52:02

190

T

De Villiers

F

30

01:57:57

223

G

Chisholm

M

47

01:59:57

309

R

Wihan

M

49

02:04:59

392

T

Terblanche

M

38

02:09:41

549

C

Crouse

M

45

02:16:53

679

K

Theron

F

28

02:22:56

738

P

Thomson

M

57

02:25:23

771

C

Pretorius

F

45

02:25:59

804

H

Marais

M

62

02:27:28

811

J

Black

M

55

02:27:35

872

S

Van Staden

F

43

02:29:44

966

Z

Black

F

52

02:33:41

1007

K

Mabunda

M

44

02:34:44

1088

K

Van Zyl

F

 

02:38:47

1236

H

Rossouw

M

43

02:46:20

1483

S

Blignaut

F

52

03:02:03

1611

S

Jantjes

M

75

03:17:55

 

Akasia Wonderpark 42km (AGN) 42km race - 2020-01-25

42 club finishers

Position

Initials

Surname

Sex

Age

Finish Time

24

J

Ntuli

M

48

02:56:35

43

I

Mnvesere

M

36

03:05:21

81

J

Mojalefa

M

 

03:16:58

93

M

Pienaar

M

36

03:18:42

106

L

De La Port

M

38

03:20:16

129

J

Wilkinson

M

41

03:24:46

181

K

Imrie

M

48

03:37:37

199

R

Moretele

M

 

03:39:04

200

M

Jacobs

F

33

03:39:07

217

L

Mashiane

   

03:40:25

222

L

Wissink

M

47

03:40:42

270

N

Young

M

36

03:46:24

271

P

Du Preez

M

34

03:46:27

319

M

Pretorius

M

45

03:51:09

320

L

Rankin

M

29

03:51:09

357

J

Welthagen

M

 

03:55:09

399

A

Watts

M

42

03:57:53

398

E

King

F

34

03:57:53

409

N

Wilkinson

F

41

03:58:27

413

E

Myburg

F

37

03:58:52

469

L

Kerling

F

28

04:03:16

495

S

Nell

F

48

04:06:11

594

E

Uys

F

55

04:14:21

632

D

Gloeck

M

63

04:16:34

683

R

Geyser

F

50

04:19:38

757

S

Classsen

M

35

04:24:41

806

T

Reyneke

M

47

04:28:44

915

J

Marais

M

38

04:34:41

917

R

Siebert

F

48

04:34:56

968

W

Van Staden

M

49

04:37:43

990

S

Mabuza

M

37

04:38:37

1064

M

King

M

41

04:43:27

1092

A

Harris

F

45

04:45:02

1102

C

Van Der Westhuizen

F

35

04:45:26

1158

H

Thompson

M

39

04:47:28

1308

J

Mothibedi

M

53

04:53:08

1408

K

Van Der Merwe

M

51

05:03:22

1409

M

Oosthuizen

   

05:03:58

1434

R

Van Der Westhuizen

M

43

05:07:03

1445

W

Burger

M

49

05:09:28

1446

E

Jordaan

M

35

05:09:29

1447

C

De Beer

M

37

05:09:30

 

RACE REPORT

Ottosdal Draf en Trap Festival (Ottosdal Night race 2020) – René van den Worm

Ottosdal is a small town in the North-West province and about three to four hours’ drive from Pretoria. The night race originated in 1993, when the Business Chamber decided the race would be an opportunity to market the town and improve its image. It has emerged from a marathon to a full festival where various cycling events take place during the morning and the marathon takes place at night.
This year (2020) marked the 27th year of the night marathon taking place.  From my research, it seemed to be the only night marathon in South Africa, which made it a bucket list item for me.  Something new and something different to explore….
 
The marathon starts at 17:30, the half marathon starts at 18:30 and the 10 km starts at 18:40.  All athletes run along the same route with various turning points on-route. Athletes that have run this race before stated that you run through the fields to the turning point (21.1 kilometre marker), which made me believe it is going to be partly dirt/gravel road.  
 
I had to check out the route profile (of course I had to plan the marathon) and it always seems easier on paper…  I remember thinking it is an out and back, now confirmed that we are going to do road running only and that no trail running is involved. The road has rolling hills (more dips and pulls and some serious slow poison). Upon further investigation and looking at the weather report, it seemed that there was a slight chance of thunderstorms and a definite chance of winds.  How nice and cool a marathon it would be, and the plus is that 17:30 will be the hottest the weather will be… I thought…
On arrival, Ottosdal seemed very windy. The registration process went quite quick and the organisers are extremely helpful in answering questions. 
 
In preparation for the marathon you need a light to see, a light to be seen and some serious mosquito spray – the slogan of this marathon is not “Speke rol, spoke hol en muskiete lol” for nothing…
So there we were, some trying to qualify for Comrades, some doing their very first marathon, some running a LSD and some to take part in the Triple Marathon challenge over the course of the weekend (Tobie Reyneke took part in this event, where you start off with Akasia marathon in Pretoria on Saturday morning, drive to Ottosdal for the night marathon and then take part in Benoni’s Johnson’s Crane marathon on Sunday morning)…and then there are the ordinary bunch of us that just wanted to tick this off their bucket list.  A big attraction of course is the opportunity to take part in the lucky draw to stand a chance to win a diamond!! You need to make sure you run at least sub 4h30 to stand in line to win that diamond as the draw takes place at 22:00 and you need to be present.  
 
I ran with Hannes Nel.  Hannes wanted kilometres on the legs and I wanted the thrill of a night race.  We agreed that we will take this race slow. The longer we take, the more time on the legs for Hannes (we thought of completing the marathon in approximate 4 hours).
 
The start of the marathon is set off with the traditional Comrades’ Chariots of Fire, giving you a big lump in your throat and if you are an emotional runner like me, you quickly wipe away that lonely tear, because somehow this song always reminds me of the challenges we face when training for and running Comrades.  It also gives me an immense pride of what all these runners are out there to achieve…. So off we were with Chariots of Fire playing in the distance, trying to run through the thick grass on the finish straight, blistering sun on your back with humid air. THIS is the start of the Ottosdal Night Marathon…
The combination of heat and wind set the race start to be extremely humid.  It is easy to start this marathon too fast and quite possible by the 5km mark to feel like you have blown.  We adjusted pace significantly. I was struggling to find my rhythm. The road seems very flat, although you can clearly see the rolling hills and pulls.  We stopped to take some photos. The wind blew every now and again, pushing hard against your body, almost as if saying: get off the road; making the “slow-poison” rolling hills on the road even more difficult.  But you soon forget about that as you place your focus and mind on your surroundings. Afterall, we were there to take an experience home.
 
The people of the community drive past you several times, offloading the lanterns from their trucks, tractors, jeeps and bakkies. The paraffin lanterns are placed approximately 20 meters apart to provide light.  The sun is still shining, with the smell of paraffin being very overwhelming. Hannes was still thinking out loud on how much paraffin they probably use for all these lanterns, when we were running past the truck with all the plastic 20 L jerry cans transporting the paraffin. It is a lot!  It soon became evident that this community know what they are doing and are extremely organised. They have a system that works for them. Some are placing the lanterns on the road and some just drive over the lantern to lid it automatically, revving the car ever so slightly to ensure the lantern is fully lit… (check out the photo).. and then we knew: night time will be here soon. 
 
A female runner and a group of club members from Klerskdorp ran past us.  I overheard her saying to the group that you feel like you are running at speed in the night, but you are much slower.  I remember thinking why she would make a comment like that as you would still run normal pace, but Hannes pointed out that she must be an experienced runner.  We were soon to learn this important lesson…. 
 
Not sure whether we automatically ran faster because we knew it will be dark soon and you want to run as much as possible in the day as this is within your comfort zone.  Knowing you won’t be able to see a thing already played tricks with my mind. I usually have negative splits during a marathon. This marathon was going to set the record straight that you can’t always run negative splits… and like the Klerksdorp athlete said, you slow down drastically at night. 
 
The lanterns were getting lid.  You are made clear that night time and the dark will set in quickly.  We turned around to look at the sun as it sets its last rays over the horizon.  The sky is the most beautiful shades of pink, blue and orange. The picture is rounded off with a windmill in the far distance, turning in the wind, waiting patiently for the promising rain.  Windmills are universally known as the symbol of life, serenity, resilience and perseverance in a harsh environment. We took in a long breath and, like the windmill, took in the calm of the landscape around us, knowing that we will soon have to become flexible to our changing environment and push through to the end with determination.  It was getting dark quick. Somewhere in the distance you hear a cow moo. And we all moo’d back at it. This is what I was there for…
 
As we approached the 21km mark and therefore the 42km turning point, night time has set.  Something happened with my mind. It is as if your senses do not know what hit you. Hannes and I had a long conversation about sensory tracking, trying to be philosophical about all of what happens within your brain and how your body react to it… We came to the conclusion that one can only see the light in front of you, enclosing your vision to only that headlamp and the long road of lanterns, but you cannot see where you have to put your foot down taking the next step, therefore causing you to run with caution, slowing you down.  
 
At about 25kms, you could hear the thunder and in the far distance see the lighting of a possible storm building. The wind that blew in the first half of the race that I complained about as it pulled and tucked at you, was sure going to assist in the second half as it would then become a nice tailwind.  Unfortunately, there was no tailwind. Nothing to dry your wet race vest, no wind, no sun. The temperature was dropping but you do not even realise it during the marathon as it still felt extremely humid.
 
The clouds in the far distance seemed stormy, every now and again, you could hear the thunder roaring, but when you looked up, the sky was so clear and you could see thousands of stars. At times the wind blew out some of the lanterns.  People are on-route though to ensure the lanterns are lit again. As an athlete I felt that they were doing a lot to make this race as comfortable as possible. 
 
This marathon was by far the quietest marathon I have ever run.  It made you feel lonely at times. You do not hear the normal footsteps at night, making you think that you are in fact running all by yourself.   You know the field is small, but could it be that the gaps are that big? You can see the stars in the night sky and you can hear the bullfrogs and screeching sound of crickets.  It is overwhelming. At every water point, you will hear the most Afrikaans songs you have ever listened to. And once you have past the water point, the night life’s sound is at play again.  In my head I was now singing an Afrikaans song: “Die padda wou gaan opsit met sy nooi in die vlei u-hum” until we meet up with more runners.  
 
Most runners did not wear reflective gear or headlamps.  Sometimes, the only thing you can see is a tiny light (other than the lanterns) in the far far distance, making the road seems extra far.  The road is quiet, but when you listen carefully, you can hear the slow shuffle on the road of fellow runners. You can’t see them though. You only see them when you are almost on top of them.
 
Mentally, the uphills in the first half are now supposed to be the down hills, but with the lanterns pathing the way, the entire road seemed to be one long stretch of uphill.  You can’t really see the uphill, but your legs and your heart rate is telling you that you are working and you are working hard at it. I felt that my entire second half was a sprint to the finish, but in reality it was a slow shuffle.
 
If it was not for our head lamps, I would most probably not be able to see my hand in front of my face.  Funny, how you could see the lanterns in the far distance, yet you could not see the approaching water point’s lights.  When you approach a water point though, it was well lid, with tons of atmosphere. Young people cheering you one with Afrikaans music, dancing (sokkie) to the music, with the kids screaming “hou bene hou” en “mooi so Oom, mooi so Tannie”!  This kept me going. The fact that they said we are almost there (even though we know it is just something spectators say), made me believe that it is true. I mean, why would a child be dishonest? ☺ 
 
By the 35 km marker, my legs were extremely sore.  You could now clearly see the town in the distance, but it seemed further away than the 7kms that are left to shuffle.  And those seven kilometres were by far the longest, slowest kilometres I have ever run (I still felt like I was sprinting).
 
At one kilometre to go, you enter the town… watch out for the potholes as you you don’t want to twist your ankle as you finish the race. We finally finished the race with tons of atmosphere at the finish area.  My legs started cramping the minute I stopped and crossed the finish line. My hamstrings were not happy with me. My knees felt tender and bruised.
It was a slow 4:25.  There is no such thing as an easy marathon, but where else in South African can you run a marathon at night with this beauty?
 
I was now looking forward to a nice hot shower and a warm bed. When you stopped running, you soon realise how extremely cold it is because of your wet clothes. I was wishing for the thunder to turn into rain to make me sleep peacefully and to forget about the pain and cramps, but we were too tired to wait for the rain. 
 
Be sure to know that the Klip Kerk  (Stone Church) just outside the show grounds offer accommodation in the form of camping and of course… they make sure that you return to Pretoria with a full stomach after eating a decent farm brekkie.

 

***

 

Our mailing address is:
magnoliaroadrunners@gmail.com

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Magnolia Road Runners · PO Box 28268 · Sunnyside · Pretoria, Gauteng 0132 · South Africa

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