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Episcopal Church of the Redeemer March 2016
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Episcopal Church of the Redeemer

March 2016 Newsletter

To seek God’s will in all that we do
To worship God as a Eucharistic community
To nurture one another in all stages of life
To go into the community to serve
To invite others to join us








Episcopal Church of the Redeemer
241 SE Second Street
Pendleton, OR 97801
541-276-3809
redeemerchurch1897@gmail.com

Church office hours are:
Tuesday        10:00AM – 2:00PM
Wednesday   10:00PM – 3:00PM
Closed for Noon Eucharist

Thursday       10:00AM – 2:00PM
If office door is locked, please knock








 
  • Sundays: Worship, 9am
  • Wednesdays: Eucharist, Noon
  • Tuesdays: Big Book Study, 1-3pm, Rhodes Hall
  • Tuesdays: Weight Watchers 5-6pm, Crysler Hall
  • Everyday: NA Meeting, 10:30am, Rhodes Hall
  • Everyday: AA Meeting, Noon, Rhodes Hall
  • Second Tuesdays: Finance Committee Meeting, Noon, Prodigal Son
  • Third Tuesdays: Monthly Vestry Meeting, 6:30pm, Elizabeth Room
You can find a printable version of Redeemer's regular monthly calendar at www.pendletonepiscopal.org.
 
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Junior Warden's Report
  • Charlotte and all present experienced an excellent Vestry Retreat February 13th.
  • At our Annual Meeting I was elected Junior Warden.Thank you to Steph Timm, Larry Weeden and others who offered to help when needed.
  • Prior to our Annual Meeting Charlotte, Steph Timm, Larry Weeden and I walked around the interior of the entire ground floor of all our facilities (except the Rectory living quarters) identifying items needing attention at any level of disrepair.The rest will be surveyed later.
  • The basement door leading to SE Dorion has a broken door lock. I have contacted Pendleton Lock & Key. Next I will take this to the Finance Committee and Vestry to discuss the need and expense.
  • I talked with Jim Nuess (House Craft). He and I will make an appointment to look at a few issues that continue on our list from a few years ago. Jim will recommend a fix and a cost estimate.
  • Parishioners have identified items needing attention: a) large trees on SE Dorion; b) crack in south foundation wall of the office toward front porch; c) light bulbs in Jackson Chapel that need to be replaced/repaired; d) switch for main altar lights, etc.
  • Randy Thomas, A Sharp Painters, met with Charlotte and me on Tuesday, February 16th to review the south side of Rectory, Rectory front steps/porch, Rectory kitchen outside steps/landing and rails, and Crysler Hall ramp.
  • DO NOT FORGET - - all this belongs to all of us!
Bill Taylor
 
 
                      Lenten Schedule 2016                                        
 
Tuesdays in Lent--Starting February 16
            Confession in Jackson Chapel    5:30 to 6:30 pm
            Redeemer
 
Wednesdays in Lent
            Soup Supper and Evensong        7 to 8:30 pm
            
                        Peace Lutheran                      March 9
                        First United Methodist            March 16
 
Sundays in Lent--Starts February 14
Class for those desiring Baptism, Confirmation, 
Reception, or Renewal of Baptismal Vows
         11 am to 12 pm
Meets in the Elizabeth Room
 
Holy Week at Redeemer 2016
Palm Sunday – Rite I                         9:00 am             March 20
Blessing of the Palms, Reading of the Passion according to Luke, and Eucharist
 
Wednesday – Rite II                           noon                  March 23
 
Maundy Thursday – Rite II                 7:00 pm             March 24
Foot Washing, Eucharist, Stripping of the Altar

All-night Vigil at the Altar of Repose,  immediately following the service       
 
Good Friday                                                         March 25             
Noon:  Reading of the Passion, Solemn Collects, Communion*
7:00 pm: Reading of the Passion, Solemn Collects, Adoration of the
Cross, Communion*
            (*Communion will be from the Reserve Sacrament)
 
The Great Vigil of Easter                 7:00 pm             March 26
Lighting of the New Fire, the Exsultet, the Story of God’s Saving
Deeds in History, Baptisms, the Renewal of Baptismal Vows, and the
First Eucharist of Easter!
 
Easter Sunday                                    9:00 am             March 27
            The Flowering of the Cross, Easter Eucharist
 
 
Reflections From Our Pastor

We have said that Lent is the training ground for the marathon of Holy Week, but what does that actually mean? What is it about Holy Week that pushes us to train for it? And why call it a marathon?
First of all, Holy Week comprises Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday and the culmination of his political insurgency in the tragedy of Good Friday, from the triumph of being hailed as the King who comes in the name of the Lord to the ignominy of being put to death as a common criminal. The highs and lows of that alone demand emotional stamina.
Then there is the sheer activity of the week. First, Jesus rides into Jerusalem. Next, we find him in the temple, driving out all those who would cheat the worshippers needing to buy temple money and animals for sacrifice. In fact, each day Jesus goes to the temple where he is continually tested by the Pharisees and the scribes who are looking for ways to twist his words into blasphemy and thereby condemn him for his political actions. We are witnesses to this struggle, and we hang on Jesus’ every word, rooting for him not to fall into the trap of the chief priests. By directly challenging the teachings of the priests and the scribes, bringing the teachings back into line with the original scriptural meaning, Jesus was provoking them to wrath, so much so that they would have seized him early on except that they were afraid of the people (Luke 20:19) Each night Jesus would retreat to the Mount of Olives to rest and regroup with his friends, but the morning would find him back in the Temple, with crowds gathering to hear his challenges to the religious powers, and we are there with him, our hearts in our mouths as we await the fury that we know the chief priests will unleash upon Jesus. The tension is so thick you can cut it with a knife, and we are worn out from waiting for the proverbial other shoe to drop.
And then, betrayal! Judas, one of the twelve, one of those closest to Jesus, succumbs to the schemes of the priests and the scribes who had been looking for a chink in Jesus’ armor. Judas agrees to rat Jesus out. Most of us know how it feels to be betrayed by a friend; some of us have even betrayed a friend for what seemed like good reasons at the time. We find ourselves in the story again, dreading the result of Judas’ collaboration and feeling its inevitability. As Jesus wrestles with his destiny in the garden of Gethsemane, desperately seeking a way to remain obedient to God but still retain his life, we struggle with Peter, James, and John to remain awake and keep vigil with our dear Lord. Suddenly… the trap is sprung! Judas and a crowd appear and Jesus is captured!
The disciples scatter, but Peter follows at a distance. Perhaps, we think, Peter will do something heroic. On the contrary, he himself betrays Jesus, denying knowing him three times. Hope turns into despair as Jesus faces trial, is tortured by the scourge (a multi-thonged whip or flail), and ultimately is crucified. The triumphant king, entering Jerusalem hailed by the crowds on Sunday, is executed as a political insurgent along with other common criminals on Friday. The dream of a conquering Messiah is dead. Jesus is removed from the cross, dead, and is buried in the tomb provided by Joseph of Arimathea.
Saturday, there is nothing... It is finished….. Dead.
This is why we need forty days of preparation.

Charlotte+
 

Date
Service Presider Eucharistic Minister Lector

3/6
Rite II Rev. Charlotte Wells Ann Marie Hardin Mary Finney

3/13
Rite I Rev. Charlotte Wells Larry Weeden Dale Hilding
3/27 Rite I Rev. Charlotte Wells Jan Stewart
David Silva
 

3/27
Rite II Rev. Charlotte Wells Dale Hilding Dave Keeler
         
Deacon Jean Cupp writes:

Our church now has a Pastoral Care Committee. Members on the committee are Liz Cahill, Bob Lanman, Heidi Scott Delph, Mary Koch, Dotty Judy, and Jean Cupp. The purpose of the group is to remain in contact with our parishioners, who are homebound, elderly, ill, hospitalized or otherwise unable to participate in Redeemer's church activities.  This will be accomplished by sending cards, making phone calls and visitations.
Treasurer's Report

This article gives some pointers how to write checks to Redeemer to assure your wishes are followed.  Taking care how the payee and memo line on your check to Redeemer is filled out is paramount. 
If the intention is to contribute to Redeemer for the benefit of Redeemer, the payee is “Church of the Redeemer” or “Redeemer,” etc., and the memo line may be marked “donation.”    
Example:  our usual pledge or plate contributions.  On Sunday mornings, most of the time this is not an issue--memo line filled in or not, the offering goes to Redeemer.  Straight forward so far, right?
Where it becomes tricky is figuring out who to make the check out to if a collection is announced for ERD or Domestic Violence Services or Flower Fund or Redeemer’s Lenten book group or for other purposes.  In this case write the payee as Church of the Redeemer, and use the memo line to direct the treasurer’s attention to your intended receiver. 
Example:  A collection is announced for Domestic Violence Services.  The payee should be Redeemer and the memo line should read Domestic Violence Services.   Your treasurer then deposits the checks and sends DVS one check for the total.  Redeemer-ites who write a check in this manner will have the contribution appear on their individual contribution record, and Church of the Redeemer will have been recognized by DVS for our church’s contribution (rather than an individual’s contribution) as having provided a sum of money collected for DVS’s operational needs.  (If you contribute cash instead of a check, please put it in an envelope; write your name on it, and also which organization you want the contribution to go to.  Your donation will also be noted on your contribution record. )
What happens if one forgets and, makes the check out to DVS, and puts the check in the collection plate?  Since the check is made out to DVS, it cannot be routed through Redeemer’s account because Redeemer cannot endorse a check that isn’t made out to it.  Also, no credit will appear on the individual contribution record, and that amount will not be included as part of Redeemer’s contribution to DVS.  However, the check will be sent on to DVS in the mail.
The bottom line is please make checks out to the Redeemer and use the memo line to indicate your desired intention. 

 

Stewardship

Rev. Charlotte has consistently talked about responsibility outside the church walls as we go about our daily dealings.   Being in church is spiritual and a place for sanctuary and to recharge our faith.   The question is do we carry it forward in our lives "out there" outside of the safety of our physical building.
 
Redeemer has accepted the definition of Stewardship as a personal passion for kindness and caring expressed in giving of time, talent and treasure for the gifts we receive from God.     Perhaps we need to expand that idea to include a statement of how we treat the outside world in our day to day interactions?    What do you think?  Any suggestions from the word smiths in our group is welcome and you really don't have to be a word smith.
 
Our Vestry retreat reemphasized the need for stewardship to be faith based regardless of giving of time, talent or treasure.   Each member of Redeemer is a member of the Stewardship Committee.    Stewardship is a emotional, personal, and private commitment to reach out to others and in turn gives each of us a personal victory in feeling better about our life.
 
Another long term goal at the meeting was the discussion of "Planned Giving".    We know the gifts from Larry Rew, Mary Johns, and Jesse Furnish along with the many memorials have allowed Redeemer to sustain a stable financial position.  Please when you consider charitable giving, include Redeemer in your thoughts and prayers.
 
Thank you Bruce and Dianne Barnes for providing us with 2016 Lenten Meditations from the Episcopal Relief and Development.   Alice and I are reading a verse a day.   Quite rewarding.
 
Peace,   
David Nelson 
Stewardship Committee


Earth's crammed with heaven,
And every common bush afire with God.
But only he who sees takes off his shoes --
The rest sit around it and pluck blackberries.
    ~Elizabeth Barret Browning
 


 
Ultreya!  A Cry of Encouragement! Keep On Going! Onward!


Team Cursillo/Ultreya--
An invitation to all Cursillistas to help plan our future

We will gather in Cove at Ascension School, beginning at noon on Friday, April 29, 2016, and concluding at noon on Sunday, May 1.
Come join us for worship, healing service, rollos, meditations, learning, planning. $75 registration fee covers cabin accommodations and meals.

More information will be available soon on our website:
www.easternoregoncursillo.org.

Registration forms can be found at the website or by contacting Sandy Holtz:
sandy Holtz@hotmail.com.




 
From Flossie Keeler:
Summer 2016: Cove Ascension Camp
Tentative schedule
More information to follow!
 
         All Things Bright and Beautiful!
 
Discovery Camp (Preschool – 2nd grade): July 5th – 7th
Beginner’s Camp (3rd – 5th grade): July 10th – 15th
Combined Camp (4th – 6th grade): July 24th – 29th
Junior High Camp (7th – 9th grade): July 17th – 23rd
Senior High Camp (10th – 12th grade): June 21st – July 2nd
Altar Guild
 
BEHIND THE RAIL
 

PATTERN FOR PALM CROSSES
 
A PALM FROND ABOUT ¼ INCHES WIDE AND 10 INCHES LONG FOR THE CROSS.
 
  1. HOLD FROND HORIZONTALLY.
  2. BEND RIGHT END UP, FROM THE CENTER, TO FORM A RIGHT ANGLE.
  3. FOLD THIS SAME TOP STRIP FROM THE CENTER, BACK AND DOWN, UP AND OVER AGAIN, TO FORM A SQUARE IN THE BACK.IT WILL STILL BE A RIGHT ANGLE.
  4. BRING THE LEFT STRIP FORWARD AND FOLD OVER THE CENTER TOWARD THE RIGHT.FOLD AWAY FROM YOU AND PULL THROUGH THE SQUARE AT THE BACK, ALL THE WAY.
  5. BEND THE TOP STRIP FORWARD AND PUT THE END THROUGH THE CENTER SQUARE TO MAKE A SHAFT OF THE DESIRED LENGTH.
  6. FOLD LEFT HAND STRIP BACKWARDS AND PUT THROUGH THE BACK SQUARE.THIS MAKES THE LEFT CROSS BAR AND SHOULD BE IN PROPORTION TO THE SHAFT.
  7. FOLD THE RIGHT STRIP BACK: PUT THROUGH THE BACK SQUARE.
 
Written instructions provided by Doris Amort.
 
Wishing everyone a blessed Palm Sunday and Easter Tide.
 
Patty Ewing-Broker, Directress
February 27, 2016


 

 
Lenten Discipline

Prayer, fasting and almsgiving, as parts of a whole schema, are disciplines that pull spirit and body together again and thrust us back into the context of our relationships and the human condition, where, indeed, our "spiritual exercises" are truly put to the test and validated. Prayer is not meant as a detachment from the world, but is an integration of the Gospel message with our human experience. Self-denial is completed beyond the self in its reinvestment of service and ministry to others. Almsgiving is not just a monetary paying-off of our guilty conscience but a challenge to love our neighbor with unselfish concern. It is taking a position of responsibility for how this human life unfolds beyond my ego-concerns. 

Gertrud Mueller Nelson: To Dance With God
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