Copy
Episcopal Church of the Redeemer July 2017
View this email in your browser

Episcopal Church of the Redeemer

July 2017 Newsletter

To seek God’s will in all that we do
To worship God as a Eucharistic community
To nurture one another in all stages of life
To go into the community to serve
To invite others to join us








Episcopal Church of the Redeemer
241 SE Second Street
Pendleton, OR 97801
541-276-3809
redeemerchurch1897@gmail.com

Church office hours are:
Tuesday        10:00AM – 2:00PM
Wednesday   10:00PM – 3:00PM
Closed for Noon Eucharist

Thursday       10:00AM – 2:00PM
If office door is locked, please knock








 
  • Sundays: Worship, 9am
  • Wednesdays: Eucharist, Noon
  • Tuesdays: Big Book Study, 1-3pm, Rhodes Hall
  • Tuesdays: Weight Watchers, 5-6pm, Crysler Hall
  • Thursdays: Cub Scout Pack 745, 6:30pm, Crysler Hall
  • Everyday: NA Meeting, 10:30am, Rhodes Hall
  • Everyday: AA Meeting, Noon, Rhodes Hall
  • Second Tuesdays: Finance Committee Meeting, Noon, Prodigal Son
  • Third Tuesdays: Monthly Vestry Meeting, 6:30pm, Elizabeth Room
Click here to view and/or print the most up to date version of Redeemer's monthly calendar.



 
Like us on Facebook
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on Twitter
Visit our Website
Visit our Website
Follow us on Instagram
Follow us on Instagram

From the Presiding Bishop, Michael B. Curry

"I ask President Trump to continue the powerful work of our refugee resettlement program without interruption."

facebook twitter linkedin email printfriendly separator share_compaMark 12:31: Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.

Leviticus 19:34: “The alien who resides with you shall be to you as the citizen among you; you shall love the alien as yourself, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt.”

Numbers 15:15:  One ordinance shall be both for you of the congregation, and also for the stranger that sojourneth with you, an ordinance for ever in your generations: as ye are, so shall the stranger be before the Lord.”

Deuteronomy 10:19: “Love ye therefore the stranger: for ye were strangers in the land of Egypt.”

As Christians, we are asked to pray: for our leaders, for our loved ones, for our enemies, and for those who are suffering. Our work does not end with prayer: we also offer assistance to those who are fleeing persecution. We find homes for those who have been forced out of their homes. We feed those who are hungry. The refugees who enter the United States do so after experiencing violence and persecution undeserved of any human being, and they come to the U.S. with hopes to build new lives. 

Refugee resettlement is a form of ministry, and one that we, and many other churches and faith-based organizations, cherish. The work of Episcopal Migration Ministries is God’s work, and we show the face of God through the care and compassion in that work. I ask President Trump to continue the powerful work of our refugee resettlement program without interruption, recognizing the long wait and screening process that means refugees wait months and sometimes years to enter the country. We ask that we continue to accept as many refugees as we have in the past, recognizing the need is greater than ever. We ask that refugees from all countries receive consideration to come to the U.S. and not to ban those who come from countries most in need of our assistance.

Our Book of Common Prayer asks for God to “look with compassion on the whole human family;” to “break down the walls that separate us and unite us in bonds of love.” On Saturday, we prayed for God our Father to look with compassion upon the widowed and orphans, outcasts and refugees, prisoners, and all who are in danger. We pray to love one another as God loves us. I echo that prayer now, and ask that we may work together to build a more grace and compassion-filled world. 

"Summer, after all, is a time when wonderful things can happen to quiet people. For those few months, you're not required to be who everyone thinks you are, and that cut-grass smell in the air and the chance to dive into the deep end of a pool give you a courage you don't have the rest of the year. You can be grateful and easy, with no eyes on you, and no past. Summer just opens the door and lets you out."

―Deb Caletti, Honey, Baby, Sweetheart

"Howlelujah Tour"

Wili Nelson

[Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Bill Miller is taking a close friend to Las Vegas on vacation, but this trip is about the bark, not the bet.

Miller’s traveling companion is his 12-year-old dog Wili, who is dying of cancer, and Vegas is only the final stop on a six-state road trip that the Episcopal priest from Louisiana is calling the “Last Howlelujah Tour.”

“It’s been extraordinary,” Miller said July 6 when reached by phone in Corsicana, Texas, south of Dallas. “The best parts of the trip have been really what we set out to accomplish, just to spend time together. We’ve just had a ball being together.”

In addition to spending precious time with Wili, the other goals of the tour are to remind people of the spiritual importance of close relationships – whether with family, friends or “man’s best friend” – and to promote and raise money for animal welfare organizations.

Wili and Bill

The tour will take the Rev. Bill Miller and Wili from Louisiana to Nevada, passing through Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Arizona. Here they pose for photo July 4 during a stop at Barrow Brewing Company in Salado, Texas. Photo: Bill Miller, via Facebook.

The stop in Corsicana was about a week into the two-week tour, and a fundraiser there July 5 raised $1,600 for the Humane Society of Navarro County. Miller has lined up about two dozen similar events in 18 cities on his route. Miller also is the author of two books, which he sells during his visits to churches, breweries and bookstores, and part of the proceeds of those sales are added to the fundraisers.

“We have met some incredibly gracious and loving people along the way. They have shown [Wili] great hospitality,” Miller said.

Miller, a 58-year-old Texas native, has served as a priest about 25 years. He was living in Austin when he got his first dog, an Airedale named Sam, in 1993. The dog’s story of surviving a house fire became the foundation for Miller’s 2005 book, “The Gospel According to Sam.” (Miller’s other book is “The Beer Drinker’s Guide to God.”)

After Sam’s death and while serving at a church in Hawaii, Miller adopted Wili from the local animal shelter. Part terrier, Wili’s full name is Nawiliwili Nelson, a little bit Hawaiian and a little bit Texan (his nickname is pronounced “Willie”). The priest felt an immediate connection to the pup.

“He just had one of these rare outgoing personalities, and he has maintained that throughout his life, even here as he’s been dealing with cancer,” Miller said.

Miller moved to Covington, Louisiana, north of New Orleans, about two years ago to become rector at Christ Episcopal Church. And he now has three dogs, including a mutt named Sinbad and a pit bull named Mahalia Jackson Queen Liliuokalani, or Lili for short.

In November, Miller noticed Wili wasn’t eating. The veterinarian diagnosed cancer the next day, and Wili was given as little as three months to live. But that three months has extended past six months and now into the summer, with the help of surgery, chemotherapy and a healthier diet for Wili.

Miller took some time off from his work at Christ Episcopal to celebrate Wili’s improved health by embarking on their current road trip. They held a launch party on June 26 at the Abita Brewery in Covington and hit the road June 30. The tour will conclude July 16 in Las Vegas, where they have three events scheduled at Mountain View Presbyterian Church.

Last Howlelujah Tour logo

The Rev. Bill Miller is sharing dog stories with fans on the stops along his “Last Howlelujah Tour” of the South and Southwest with Wili. Photo: Bill Miller

The tour will take them from Louisiana to Nevada, passing through Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Arizona, and counting the return trip, Miller expects them to cover about 5,000 miles before reaching home. He also will be preaching along the way, including Sunday, July 9, at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Oklahoma City.

But the most important thing for him, personally, is to spend time with Wili, who has a water bowl and plenty of space to rest with the seat down in the back of Miller’s Honda CRV. They’ve been thanking God for air-conditioning while navigating the hot highways of the South and Southwest. They travel light and look for cheap, dog-friendly hotels when they stop.

“Wili has not lost any enthusiasm for life and his love for people,” Miller said.

It’s one example why Miller describes dogs as “God’s best work.”

“I think what dogs teach us is how to be our best selves, because they exhibit unconditional love and affirmation,” he said. “They’re able to show us such love at every moment. They’re always happy to see us, the tail is always wagging. They take such delight in the simple things in life.”

– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service.

 


 Altar Guild
 

BEHIND THE RAIL

July, 2017
Where true charity is, there is God.
 
The Altar Guild has kept busy this last month trying to keep the Altar flowers from wilting in this heat.  Those flowers are so special to the congregation each week, I look forward to announcing the people who donate them in loving memory of God and loved ones.  Please remember those individuals in your prayers.

I have also been asked what the words are to the Ubi caritas chant. I found this:

Ubi caritas is a hymn of the Western Church long used as one of the antiphons for the washing of feet on Maundy Thursday The Gregorian melody was composed sometime between the fourth and tenth centuries, though some scholars believe the text dates from early Christian gatherings before the formalization of the Mass. It is usually sung at Eucharistic Adoration and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament and on Holy Thursday evening at the Mass of the Lord's Supper. The current Roman Catholic Missal reassigned it from the foot-washing mandatum to the offertory procession at the Holy Thursday Mass of the Lord's Supper, and it also is found in current Anglican and Lutheran hymnals.

In the second typical edition (1975) of the current Roman Missal, the antiphonal response was altered to read "Ubi caritas est vera, Deus ibi est," after certain very early manuscripts. This translates as: "Where true charity is, there is God." 

Patty Ewing-Broker, Directress
July, 2017

 
   
 

Coming This Summer to Ascension School

2017 Camp Schedule

“One Body, One Spirit”

 


Discovery Camp (Preschool – 2nd grade): June 27th – 29th

Discovery Camp is an overnight camping experience for your youngest campers. Discovery Camp is designed to be an introduction to summer camp. We require our PreK – second graders to have a parent or adult attend with them.
Check in 10:00am -11:00am (before lunch) on Tuesday.
Camp ends on Thursday after lunch.
Camp cost: $165.00 per person
 
Beginner’s Camp (3rd – 5th grade): July 9th – 14th
This week will be filled with making friends, swimming, crafts, outdoor games and short field trips that explore the area around camp. Campers get to experience Christ through making friends and being creative with crafts and skits.
Check in 3:00pm – 5:00pm on the first day of camp.
Camp ends at 8:30am on the last day of camp.
Camp cost: $ 500.00

Combined Camp (4th – 6th grade): July 23rd – 28th
Combined Camp gives families another choice for sending their elementary age children to camp. This week will be filled with making friends, swimming, crafts, outdoor games and short field trips that explore the area around camp. Campers get to experience Christ through making friends and being creative with crafts and skits.
Check in 3:00pm – 5:00pm on the first day of camp.
Camp ends at 8:30am on the last day of camp.
Camp cost: $ 420.00

Junior High Camp (7th – 9th grade): July 16th – 22nd
We will continue our ongoing tradition of doing at least one service-based project this year.  All the traditional camp activities will be included along with exciting field trips to explore the beautiful surroundings.
Check in 3:00pm – 5:00pm on the first day of camp.
Camp ends at 8:30am on the last day of camp.
Camp cost: $ 500.00

Senior High Camp (10th – 12th grade): July 1st – 8th
We will continue our ongoing tradition of doing at least one service-based project this year.  All the traditional camp activities will be included along with exciting field trips to explore the beautiful surroundings.
Check in 3:00pm – 5:00pm on the first day of camp.
Camp ends at 8:30am on the last day of camp.
Camp cost: $ 500.00

Wallowa Adventures (8th – 12th grade): July 30th – August 4th
Participants will have the opportunity to go backpacking in the Wallowa Mountains experiencing creation and learning about environmental stewardship. Campers do not have to have experience backpacking, we will spend time on the Ascension grounds learning the basics of backpacking.
Check in 3:00pm – 5:00pm on the first day of camp.
Camp ends at 8:30am on the last day of camp.
Camp cost: $ 500.00
 
Adult Education Event:  August 24th - 27th - How our faith intersects with our everyday work.

Solar Eclipse Experience: August 18th – 21st – Watch for more details at coveascensionschool.com
  
  
 
 

 

How To Be A Neighbor
 

This past weekend I went out with a group from my parish to serve with 249 & Hope, a ministry for and with our brothers and sisters living along the local highway. This was my first time to go along with the group, and I was struck by the question the ministry leader asked me. “What are we going to learn today?”

I didn’t have an answer.

Too often, I think the church goes out into its neighborhood to solve problems. Let’s feed the homeless, or tutor in the local school, or visit the sick and lonely. These are all good things that we, as Christians, should do! But we don’t do them because we can provide solutions to other people’s problems.

Instead, we should do them - we should seek to be with our neighbors - because God created us to live, work, serve, and learn in community. Not just the community we hand pick because it has the best music or the funniest sermons; rather, the community we are a part of simply because we live there.

As we live, work, serve, and learn in community, we should begin to see the ways in which others teach (and serve) us. We should ask ourselves the question the ministry leader asked me this past Saturday: What are we going to learn today?

Put another way, “What does God want to teach us?”

Henri Nouwen, in his book Discernment: Reading the Signs of Daily Life, says, “People we meet, some great in the eyes of the world and some almost invisible to the larger society, are often conduits of God’s wisdom.”

So how can we learn to better receive, listen, and learn from those around us? How can we start to hear God through the people we serve?

--Alan Bentrup

  

 
div>
Share
Tweet
Forward