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July 15, 2020 | FEATURED: Hollywood tech guru 👀

 

Welcome back, <<First Name>> 🎉

Was anyone else inspired to buy a lottery ticket from our Monday edition? *Crickets*  No? Well then, let's look at how data and analytics are shaping the entertainment and healthcare industries 🧠
 

THE STORIES 

🎬 Moneyball for movies

💉 Expanding healthcare in red states

 
INDUSTRY INSIGHT: ENTERTAINMENT & MACHINE LEARNING

🎬 Moneyball for movies

 

WHAT 

  • When we watch movies/TV, we typically don’t think about all the data and analytics going on behind the scenes (😜). But it’s a mistake not to.
  • The past few years have seen data science and AI being used to change the entertainment business by the same people who reshaped sports analytics (like in Moneyball).
  • From deciding what content to make all the way to release & marketing decisions, data analytics will play a huge role in the production and consumption of entertainment.

WHO

  • Matthew Marolda, head of Applied Analytics at Legendary and later WarnerMedia. Marolda founded StratBridge LLC, which sold analytics solutions to NFL and NBA teams, and was acqui-hired by Legendary.

WHY SHOULD I CARE 

  • Imagine, for example, how much a studio would save if they could reliably predict how a movie would perform before pumping hundreds of millions of dollars into making it. If someone could produce those kinds of insights, they’d make a sh*t ton of money.
  • Machine learning is constantly finding new applications, and entertainment presents a huge opportunity. 

TL;DR 

  • “Like everything else in Hollywood, of course the intelligence would also be artificial.” Okay no one actually said that, but you definitely thought it was funnier when it could’ve been a quote from someone relevant.
  • The point is: the wave of ML/AI sweeping through the entertainment industry is definitely something to watch.

READ MORE HERE
 


PUBLIC POLICY

💉 Expanding healthcare in red states

 

WHAT

  • One of the major provisions of the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) was the expansion of Medicaid. Here’s how it’s intended to work: Medicaid expansion is conducted at the state level with partial funding from state governments, and partial funding from the federal government. 
  • However, now ten years after the ACA became law, 14 states still have not expanded Medicaid due to budget concerns, saying that funding the expansion would force them to cut important areas such as transportation and education. 
  • This breakthrough paper, though, shows that in the other 36 states that did increase Medicaid, it was the federal government that ended up paying for almost all of the added costs. 
  • Knowing this, the other 14 states might be more willing to begin rolling out expansions.

WHO 

  • Professor Sommers of Harvard University does a little bit of everything: he’s a physician, economist, and wordsmith (he studied English as an undergrad). 

WHY SHOULD I CARE

  • The 14 states that have yet to adopt Medicaid expansion are shown in orange in the map above. It might be tempting to say that their reluctance is rooted purely in partisanship and unhappiness with Obamacare, but that wouldn’t be quite fair.
  • In fact, even deep red supporters in Oklahoma support Medicaid expansion — it’s the leadership in Oklahoma that opposes it
  • If these new findings can in fact advance the debate, it would be a great testament to the importance of continued public policy research such as this.

TL;DR 

  • Recent research on states that increased Medicaid under Obamacare shows that these expansions were, effectively, subsidized almost entirely by the federal government. 
  • These findings could encourage states that have held out to begin more Medicaid rollouts, which could insure more than 2 million low-income adults. 

READ MORE HERE

PROFESSOR'S CORNER

Hope you guys liked the brainteaser from Monday’s issue  we're cooking up a neat one in our next edition 🍜. Today we have a book recommended by Joseph Newhouse, a professor at Harvard Medical School.

Read NYT Book Review here

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