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TBI Support Group

Dr. Redmond answers questions about the daily visual activities that can be difficult for traumatic brain injury survivors like: grocery shopping, driving, and even walking down a sidewalk.

On November 6th, 2015, Highline Center for Vision Performance hosted a Traumatic Brain Injury survivor's group in order to educate individuals about the visual component of head injury and the need for remediation to return to normalcy. Our special guest was Linda Arms, a brain injury survivor and author of the Brain Fairy blog.

Information to help TBI survivors get through challenging situations and the holidays were discussed and resources provided. If you would like to receive the handouts from this group, please let us know.

Sibling teens graduate from Vision Therapy

 
According to Danielle and Colton’s mother, Jo, both teens have always worked hard and did very well in school. But it was during an annual eye exam that an optometrist thought Colton might have a vision skills problem. A vision performance screening revealed Colton’s eyes were not working well as a team and that contributed to him reading very slow. When Colton learned that through Vision Therapy, many people also improve their sports performance, he was all-in. Danielle is a very self-driven young woman enrolled in several honors courses. She worked on her homework for hours every night and suffered from migraines and extreme visual fatigue. A screening revealed her tracking was very slow and strained. Now that both teens have graduated the program, they report excellent results.
 

Results

Both teens elevated their reading efficiency and comprehension from  elementary school levels to college levels in only six months!  This allows them to complete homework in less time. Colton’s catching and hitting in baseball have improved and Danielle no longer has headaches or complains about how long it takes to read. Her ACT test scores even improved 5 points!
 

Mom's perspective

According to Jo, Vision Therapy has been “one of those invaluable, priceless things.” She adds that so many struggling kids - like those with ADHD - need to have the vision performance screening. “If you would just take them in for the quick screening to find out if they can be helped, these struggling kids could be excelling.”
 
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When to draw the line?

Technology in the classroom and its impact on learning continue to be a hot topic among educators today. In this article from the Washington Post, This year, I resolve to ban laptops from my classroom, one college professor promises to make changes in order to help his students learn.

Why focusing on a visual task will make us deaf to our surroundings


"Concentrating attention on a visual task can render you momentarily 'deaf' to sounds at normal levels, reports a new UCL study funded by the Wellcome Trust."

Read more in this article from Science Daily.

High school testing and college entry exams


Even high achieving students can have visual skills deficiencies. These students have devoted extra time and effort on homework while in high school in order to succeed. Struggling students may be working even harder to maintain average grades. However, college will demand more work in less time. Our visual performance programs can make reading more efficient and free up more stamina for learning to ensure academic success with less effort!

Students can have a FREE Vision Performance Screening to determine if their comfort, efficiency, and stamina can be improved for the task of learning!

Screentime is making Kids Moody, Crazy, and Lazy

Children or teens who are “revved up” and prone to rages or—alternatively—who are depressed and apathetic have become disturbingly commonplace. Chronically irritable children are often in a state of abnormally high arousal, and may seem “wired and tired.” That is, they’re agitated but exhausted.
Read more at Psychology Today...

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