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The Librarian's Corner
A Note from the University Librarian
University Librarian Steve Mandeville-GambleEnsuring that the UCR Library is meeting the needs of the UCR community is always at the forefront of my thoughts. While formal strategic planning and implementation efforts are a significant part of charting our path to meet those goals, in an era of constant change we need to continuously take stock of where we are, the ways in which the landscape is evolving, and what opportunities are emerging that would allow us to better support our faculty, students, staff, and community members in their teaching and research missions.

We recently gathered some of the nation’s preeminent thought-leaders and pace-setters on African American culture and history to advise the library on how best to support scholarship on the African diaspora here at UCR and beyond. At the inaugural African American Collections Advisory Board meeting, which you can read more about below, top scholars and archivists in the field came together to advise the library on the best practices and strategies in collecting and preserving the history of under-served and underrepresented communities in support of our academic partners on campus and beyond.

Last week, global experts in the potential role of cultural heritage institutions in today’s connected world — and what it means for communities of knowledge to not just be "on" the web but "of" the web — engaged library staff in two days of conversations about the emerging services in university libraries and to lay the vision for the future of the UCR Library.

The opportunities facing the library to be part of a fundamental rethinking of how we can best work as partners for our students’ and faculty members’ success have never been greater or at the same time more confusing. And no one person can hope to divine the correct path forward. I encourage the entire UCR Library community to be part of the ongoing academic and professional conversations on how we can better meet our academic partners' needs. I invite you to join me as we work to envision and build the UCR Library that our students, faculty, staff, and community need and deserve.

Sincerely,
University Librarian's signature
Steve Mandeville-Gamble
University Librarian
Library Welcomes New Science Fiction Librarian
First Klein Librarian raising profile of Eaton Collection. Though only in her first month at the UCR Library, JJ Jacobson is already filled with ideas, energy, and ambition. As the inaugural Jay Kay and Doris Klein Science Fiction Librarian, she manages and curates the Eaton Collection of Science Fiction & Fantasy – the largest publicly-accessible collection of science fiction, fantasy, horror, and utopian literature in the world.

Jacobson brings a broad range of experience to the Eaton Collection. Once a restaurant owner, chef, baker, and then sourdough consultant, the California native was drawn to library and information school by her interest in how people talk about and engage with what they cook and eat.

University of Michigan provided Jacobson with her foundational education in library and information science, and sparked a passion in her to make the world a better place by bringing together people, information, and technology.

Growing up at Renaissance Faires, her interest in the “history of everyday life” stimulated Jacobson’s personal passion for living history — similar to historical re-enactment, but with less focus on combat and more on the daily activities of a certain period — and alternate history, a genre of fiction in which history unfolds differently from reality. This led her to experiment with virtual worlds. Specifically, Jacobson became deeply involved in Second Life in a unique way that mirrored, and later reinforced, her career: she became a librarian.
 
With sponsorship from another Second Life Resident, Jacobson built Caledon Library, pictured above. It has since grown into an entire system of virtual library branches. "Residents moved to Caledon because of the library," she boasted. Jacobson would later develop kits for others to build and manage their own libraries in Second Life. Real-life libraries also established presences in Second Life.

Reading, Jacobson says, is a prevalent hobby in her family. Her father was a fan of science fiction in its golden age, and she and her brother were both avid readers, constantly marveling at the 8-foot shelf of paperbacks in her father’s personal collection.

Jacobson’s goal is to leverage the ever-broadening interest in the “Eatonverse” genres to build a deeper understanding of the collection. By drawing on the UCR community’s enthusiasm for these genres across formats and uses, she aims to maintain Eaton’s international prestige while positioning it as a leader in the developing ecosystem of similar collections across the world.

 
African American Collections Advisory Board Holds Inaugural Meeting
National leaders convene to support and advise UCR Library. On Saturday, September 19, 2015, the UCR Library hosted the inaugural meeting of the newly-established African American Collections Advisory Board. Thought-leaders from across the nation met with library and university leaders to discuss and establish best practices in collecting and preserving the history of the African American experience, and methods of documenting local, regional, national, and international issues.

The day-long series of round-table conversations were energized by national leaders such as Dr. Meredith Evans, Associate University Librarian at Washington University in St. Louis who spearheaded the Documenting Ferguson project and Dr. Abdul Alkalimat, Professor Emeritus of African American Studies and library and information science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Prominent community members also joined the discussion series, including Rose M. Mayes, Executive Director of the Fair Housing Council of Riverside County and president of the Riverside African American Historical Society, and Hardy Brown, Jr., Executive Director of the Black Voice Foundation.

University Librarian Steven Mandeville-Gamble encouraged the board to broaden the scope of their work on behalf of the UCR Library by not limiting their focus to black Americans. Scholars and leaders from across UCR disciplines — including Vice Provost for International Affairs Kelechi Kalu, and faulty from the departments of Ethnic Studies and History — engaged the group in discussion about how the university can best support the library, and the international scholarly community, in collecting and preserving history from underserved and underrepresented communities at large. Bergis Jules and Dr. Alison M. Scott, both from the library's Special Collections and University Archives department, described their past and current work in this arena and shared their successes and challenges.

Further discussion evolved around fundraising as a necessary aspect of collecting historical documentation, building relationships in communities that have historically been distrustful of higher education as a reliable keeper of their family history, as well as the importance of educating the general public about the "history of everyday life" and the valuable historical snapshot that a seemingly-unexceptional object may hold for others in the future.

This first meeting of the American Collections Advisory Board formally launches the UCR Library's nationwide collaborative efforts to share, create, and sustain knowledge among ethnic groups whose history and experiences are woven into the fabric of the country. While library initiatives such as the founding of the Tuskegee Airmen Archive in 2005 and the newly-established Inland Empire Memories project have exemplified the library's and university's continued commitment to diversity on campus, this Board elevates UCR to a significantly larger stage, and establishes the university as driving these vital considerations on a national and international level.

 
Latino Americans Grant Team Kicks Off Year of Programming
Library launches program series surrounding Latino American experience. On October 9th, the UCR Library hosted a kickoff reception to launch a year of programming supported by the Latino Americans 500 Years of History grant. Awarded to the library earlier this year by the National Endowment of Humanities (NEH) and the American Library Association (ALA), the grant funds a series of programs focused on the Latino American experience. Events over the course of the next year will include documentary screenings and performances by project scholars.

Paul D’Anieri, Vice-Chancellor and Provost of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Steven Mandeville-Gamble, University Librarian discussed UCR’s role as a Hispanic Serving Institution and champion of diversity, and the library’s commitment to supporting that effort. Drs. Tiffany Lopez, Jonathan Ritter, and Jennifer Najera detailed their involvement in the year’s events, and program partner UCR Chicano Student Programs provided insight into the potential effect of these programs on their student populations. Community members in attendance shared stories about their lives and work in the community to promote continued and renewed interest in Latino Chicano American heritage and history.

The ALA and NEH designed the Latino Americans 500 Years of History grant to be inclusive of all members of the campus and local communities. Project partners such as the Center for Social Justice, Spanish Town Heritage Foundation, and several branches of Riverside Public Library will provide venues for some of the year's programs.

"We hope that this grant will foster a tradition of collaborative curriculum and promote further interest in the preservation of local community history," said grant Project Director Anthony Sanchez. The grant has received strong support from national student organizations such as MEXUS, as well as state and local public officials, many of whom attended the reception. The event provided a rare opportunity for cross-community conversations about upcoming projects and possible collaborations.

 
Calendar
All buildings will be closed November 11th for Veteran's Day and November 26th - 27th for Thanksgiving.

Visit library.ucr.edu/hours for current hours and holiday schedules. 

Upcoming Workshops

See the complete calendar of library workshops here.

AVOIDING PLAGIARISM
Tues., 10/27 | 3-4 PM

INTRO TO RESEARCH DATA MANAGEMENT
Weds., 10/28 | 12:10-1 PM

PUBLIC SPEAKING
Weds., 11/4 | 3-4:30 PM

APPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
Fri., 11/6 | 2-3 PM

INFOGRAPHICS
Weds., 11/10 | 4-5 PM
R'News
Last month, the library co-hosted a 3-hour workshop kicking off the Facilitating Innovation & Engagement series and a strong partnership with Faculty Technology Support.

Over forty faculty and staff attended "Rethinking Your Classroom: Leveraging Technology-Infused Instruction for Flexibility, Engagement, and Persistence," co-hosted by the Instructional Design team from Faculty Technology Support in Computing and Communications and the Office of Undergraduate Education.

Steve Friese, Assistant Director of Instructional Design from University of California Office of the President, shared insights into UC's Innovative Learning Technology Initiative (ILTI). Faculty members shared successful modules they have developed to engage students in discovering the physical library and resources, developing research skills, evaluating resources, and illustrating real-life applications. The workshop concluded with a series of lightening rounds showcasing support services for instruction, exploring possibilities of online course design, library data services, and integrating information literacy and Special Collections materials to enhance course assignments and facilitate higher student engagement.

The Facilitating Innovation & Engagement series continues throughout the fall quarter with workshops in the Orbach Science Library, Olmstead Hall, and the Surge building. For more information, please contact engage@ucr.edu.
UCR's Tartan Soul Kickoff event during the 2015 Highlander Welcome Week was a resounding success. This marked the UCR Library's first, but certainly not last, participation in the event put on by the UCR Office of Student Life.

More than 540 students mingled with a multitude of campus departments that set up activity booths around the UCR bell tower.

Students filled out "passports" by completing an activity at each booth, and received Tartan Soul shirts as their reward. Respect — a Tartan Soul value that exemplifies a Highlander through their regard for others' rights and dignity — was an underlying theme of the event.

The library booth welcomed students who got the chance to guess the decade in which a handful of photos from the University Archives were taken. The library's Special Collections and University Archives department was of great interest to students, as were library services such as laptop checkout, 24-hour chat reference, interlibrary loans, and library workshops and events.

Additional Tartan Soul events are expected to take place throughout the year, each focusing on one of the Highlander values of integrity, accountability, excellence, and respect.
Staff Stuff
The UCR Library welcomed Lisa Dye as Organizational Design and Human Resources Director on Oct. 12th.

On Oct. 26th, Lee Banda came aboard as Director of Planning and Budget.

Angela Lee will join the library as Medical Librarian on Nov. 10th.

Kimberlee Frederick, Raul Aguilera, and Sunny Gandhi joined the Circulation/Reserves unit this month.

Tracy Wandel, Library Assistant in Rivera Library Circulation / Reserves, passed away on Saturday, Sept. 19th. Tracy was a library employee for 18 years and will be genuinely missed.
The UCR Library serves the research and teaching needs of the campus, and serves Inland Southern California as the regional research library. Your gift makes a tremendous difference—through philanthropic support, you help the students, staff, and faculty at UCR make a positive impact on society.

UCR is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization and gifts to UCR are tax deductible to the extent allowed by State and Federal law.
 
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