Copy

facebook twitter pinterest Like Poem: “Keep Me, Jesus, Keep Me” by Poet Waverley Turner Carmichael on Facebook
Sponsored by:
 

Poem: “Keep Me, Jesus, Keep Me” by Poet Waverley Turner Carmichael

Feb 12, 2021 12:25 pm

Waverley Turner Carmichael was an African-American author. He was born in Snow Hill, Alabama. During the First World War he served with 92nd Infantry Division of the United States Army in France. After the war, Carmichael worked as a clerk with the United States Postal Service in Boston. A collection of his poetry was published […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Poem: “Keep Me, Jesus, Keep Me” by Poet Waverley Turner Carmichael on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Black Abolitionists: After Martin Luther King Jr.

Feb 12, 2021 12:25 pm

By Lestey Gist, The Gist of Freedom Martin Luther King Jr. Remembered! Assassinated April 4th, 1968 After two workers were crushed to death in a truck’s compactor, the sanitation workers went on strike Feb. 11. They demanded a raise that would take them off welfare lines. The situation had obvious racial undertones: Most of the […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Black Abolitionists: After Martin Luther King Jr. on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters : The First Black Labor Union Chartered By The American Federation Of Labor

Feb 12, 2021 12:25 pm

The International Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and Maids was the first African American labor union chartered by the American Federation of Labor (AFL). Pullman porters, dissatisfied with their treatment by the Chicago-based Pullman Company, sought the assistance of A. Philip Randolph and others in organizing their own union, founded in New York in 1925. […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters : The First Black Labor Union Chartered By The American Federation Of Labor on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Clementine Hunter: Self-Taught African-American Folk Artist

Feb 12, 2021 12:25 pm

Clementine Hunter was a self-taught African-American folk artist from the Cane River region of the U.S. state of Louisiana, who lived and worked on Melrose Plantation. She is the first African-American artist to have a solo exhibition at the present-day New Orleans Museum of Art. Hunter was born around 1886 and was the granddaughter of […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Clementine Hunter: Self-Taught African-American Folk Artist on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Calvin Scott Brown: Educator, Editor & Advisor

Feb 12, 2021 12:25 pm

Calvin Scott Brown, educator, editor, minister, and advisor, was born in Salisbury of black and Scotch-Irish ancestry. His father was Henry Brown, a farmer, and his mother was Flora Brown. Brought up in poverty, he was educated at Freedman’s Aid Society School, Salisbury, and Shaw University, Raleigh, where he earned A.B., A.M., and D.D. degrees. […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Calvin Scott Brown: Educator, Editor & Advisor on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Ariel Williams: Pioneer Educator and Poet

Feb 12, 2021 12:25 pm

Ariel Williams was an educator and poet. She received a bachelor’s degree in music from Fisk University in 1926 and a second bachelor’s degree in music from the Oberlin Conservatory of Music. After completing her education, Williams taught music in North Carolina, Florida, and Alabama. She was the first supervisor of music in the Mobile, […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Ariel Williams: Pioneer Educator and Poet on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Walter “Wiley” Jones One of the Wealthiest African-Americans in the South

Feb 12, 2021 12:25 pm

Walter “Wiley” Jones was a businessman in Pine Bluff, Arkansas in the late 19th century. He was noted as being one of the wealthiest African-Americans in Arkansas. Jones was the owner of the cities first streetcar company, and also owned a park in the city which housed fairgrounds. Jones was born on July 14, 1848, in […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Walter “Wiley” Jones One of the Wealthiest African-Americans in the South on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Gerri Major: Served as Society Editor and Associate Editor for “Ebony” Magazine

Feb 12, 2021 12:25 pm

Gerri Major was an African-American woman who lived in Harlem during a career that stretched from the 1920s through the 1970s. She had a successful career as a journalist, editor, newscaster, publicists, public health official, and community leader. She was called one of the ‘new Negroes’ of the early 20th century. By the end of […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Gerri Major: Served as Society Editor and Associate Editor for “Ebony” Magazine on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Clarissa Scott Delany: Poet, Essayist, Educator & Social Worker

Feb 12, 2021 12:25 pm

Clarissa Scott Delany was an African American poet, essayist, educator and social worker during the Harlem Renaissance. Scott was born in Tuskegee, Alabama. Her father, Emmet Jay Scott was secretary to Booker T. Washington, founder of Tuskegee Institute, the historically black college. After her early years in Alabama, she was sent to New England where […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Clarissa Scott Delany: Poet, Essayist, Educator & Social Worker on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Flash Black Photo: Ella Fitzgerald | Legends of Music Series

Feb 12, 2021 12:25 pm

At Black Then, we frequently see interesting photos that give us a glimpse into the past. They tend to show us a piece of black history that is often not covered in textbooks, in history classes, or shown in the media. In a photo that we found on Black History Album , we see this […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Flash Black Photo: Ella Fitzgerald | Legends of Music Series on Facebook Google Plus One Button
COPYRIGHT (C) 2016 - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED - BLACK THEN
Unsubscribe