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Adah Bell Thoms: Pioneer Nurse, Educator, and Activist

Feb 21, 2020 01:12 pm

Adah Bell Thoms was a pioneering nurse, educator, administrator, and activist who was on a crusade for better opportunities for black people in the nursing profession. She was also active in international efforts to advance the nursing profession. Thoms was born in Richmond, Virginia, and was the daughter of Harry and Melvina Samuels. After graduating […]

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Marcena W. Taylor: Helped Integrate the Detroit Fire Department

Feb 21, 2020 01:12 pm

Marcena W. Taylor was one of two African American firefighters to integrate the Detroit Fire Department in the late 1930s. Taylor as born on January 25, 1911 in Chattanooga, Tennessee and moved to Detroit in 1927. He attended Miller Middle School, Northwestern High School and graduated in 1928 with honors. After graduating, he went on […]

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Wheatley-Provident Hospital: First Medical Facility to Serve Black Community of Kansas City, Missouri

Feb 21, 2020 01:12 pm

Wheatley-Provident Hospital was founded in 1916. It was the first medical facility to serve the Black community of Kansas City, Missouri. The hospital was first created in 1910 as the Perry Sanitarium and Training School for nurses, named after Dr. J. Edward Perry. Dr. John Edward Perry, an African American doctor from Texas, sought to […]

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Flashback Photo: African American Family

Feb 21, 2020 01:12 pm

African american woman with children For more on the African American experience and achievements in the U.S. and elsewhere visit Discover Black Heritage , a travel guide to African American history and culture. Found at Black History Album on

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Charles H. Wesley: American Author, Historian, Educator, Minister

Feb 21, 2020 01:12 pm

Charles H. Wesley was an American author, historian, educator, and minister. Wesley published over 15 books on African-American history and once served as the president of Wilberforce University. He was also the founding president of Central State University in Ohio. Wesley was born on December 2, 1891, in Louisville, Kentucky, and was the only child […]

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Solomon Northup: Kidnapped and Sold into Slavery, “12 Years A Slave”

Feb 21, 2020 01:12 pm

Solomon Northup was a free black man living in New York on his own land. He grew up in Washington County and did odd jobs while he lived there. He was eventually contracted to carry materials on the canal and often played his fiddle while traveling. While in Washington, D.C., Northup was drugged, kidnapped, and […]

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Frank Embree: Lashed Over 100 Times into a Confession

Feb 21, 2020 01:12 pm

Frank Embree was nineteen when he was accused of raping a 14-year-old white girl. Embree was from the state of Missouri, and black men convicted of rape of a white woman were sentenced to death by lynching. Although he maintained that he was innocent, he was whipped over 100 times until he confessed to the […]

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Jessie Pharr Slaton: One of the First African Americans to Hold a White-Collar Job in Detroit

Feb 21, 2020 01:12 pm

Jessie Pharr Slaton dedicated her life to the service of the people of Detroit and of Michigan. She became one of the first African-American women in Detroit’s City government to hold a white-collar job. Slaton was born in Atlanta, Georgia in 1983. At the age of eight, she along with her family moved to Detroit.  […]

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[Video] Fayard A. Nicholas: Member of the Nicholas Brothers Tap-Dance Duo

Feb 21, 2020 01:12 pm

Fayard Antonio Nicholas was an American choreographer, dancer, and actor. He and his younger brother Harold Nicholas made up the Nicholas Brothers tap-dance duo, who starred in the MGM musicals An All-Colored Vaudeville Show (1935). Nicholas was born in Alabama but grew up in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He learned to dance by watching vaudeville shows with […]

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The Connection Between African Americans And History Of Barbeque

Feb 21, 2020 01:12 pm

The word barbecue and the open-fire cooking technique came from the Caribbean amongst the Taino people around the late 17th century. The word barbecue itself means “sacred fire pit.” The unique way to cook meat spread into Spanish, French and American cultures when slaves were brought from the Caribbean. In the Southern United States, barbecue […]

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