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Today In Black History: Jesse Owens Achieves “The Greatest 45 Minutes Ever In Sport”

Apr 06, 2020 11:28 am

By Kelvin Muhia For many athletes today, breaking a world record would be a lifetime accomplishment. On May 25, 1935, James Cleveland “Jesse” Owens was the first black American athlete to tear the record book apart through breaking three world records and tying a fourth in just 45 minutes. Born on September 12, 1913 in Oakville, Alabama, […]

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Olivia Ferguson McQueen: Challenged School Segregation in Charlottesville, Va

Apr 06, 2020 11:28 am

In 1958, Olivia Ferguson McQueen, a sixteen-year-old rising senior at the all-black Jackson P. Burley High School, led a group of students in challenging school segregation in Charlottesville. After a federal district court judge ruled in the students’ favor, the governor closed the all-white Lane High School, where McQueen was to attend, rather than allow […]

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Peter Jacob Carter: Renowned Public Speaker & Political Leader

Apr 06, 2020 11:28 am

Peter Jacob Carter is remembered as an excellent public speaker, who campaigned for Republican candidates throughout eastern Virginia during the 1870s and later in the 1880s after the Readjuster Party ceased to exist. Carter was born into slavery in Eastville, Northampton County on May 29, 1845. He joined Company B of the 10th United States […]

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Rapper Talib Kweli Passionately Explains How the US Prison System Evolved from Slavery

Apr 06, 2020 11:28 am

Talib Kweli Greene is an American hip hop recording artist from Brooklyn, New York City, New York. Kweli also earned recognition through his work with fellow Brooklyn-bred rapper Mos Def, in East Coast hip hop group Black Star, as they are collectively known.

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Poet Rita Dove’s, “Exit”

Apr 06, 2020 11:28 am

“Exit” Just when hope withers, the visa is granted. The door opens to a street like in the movies, clean of people, of cats; except it is your street you are leaving. A visa has been granted, “provisionally”-a fretful word. The windows you have closed behind you are turning pink, doing what they do every […]

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Policy: A Lottery Game First Played Throughout Chicago’s Black Community

Apr 06, 2020 11:28 am

In 1885, three men: a white man named Patsy King, an Asian named “King Foo,” and a black street hustler named “Policy” Sam Young introduced the game “Policy” to Chicago. Policy was an illegal game played in a similar way as the lottery of today. The game was a big part of Chicago’s black community. Players […]

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Roberts v. The City of Boston: Five-Year-Old Black Girl Forced to Walk 5 Miles to School (1849)

Apr 06, 2020 11:28 am

In 1849, the case of Roberts vs. The City of Boston was established, which was about a five-year-old black girl being denied the right to attend school. Sarah Roberts was denied the right to attend a local primary school because she was black, so her father sued the state. The judge who presided over the […]

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Isaiah DeQuincey Newman: Pioneer Pastor, Entrepreneur and Civil Rights Activist

Apr 06, 2020 11:28 am

Isaiah DeQuincey Newman was a Methodist pastor, civil rights activist, and entrepreneur who was a leading figure during the Civil Rights movement in South Carolina. Newman was born on April 17, 1911, in Darlington County, SC to the Rev. Meloncy C. and Charlotte Elizabeth Newman. He was the fifth child of their sixteen children. Educated […]

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Black West: Boley, Oklahoma 1903

Apr 06, 2020 11:28 am

Following the American Civil War, the Great Migration saw Black people move out of the Deep South and settle in other regions. One of these regions was still somewhat untamed Mid-South. One of the many settlements includes Boley, Oklahoma in Indian Territory’s Creek Nation.   The Establishment of Boley This settlement had the early 20th […]

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The Rise Of The Black Swan, America’s First Black Owned Record Label

Apr 06, 2020 11:28 am

Harry Herbert Pace was the founder of the first black record company, Pace Phonograph Corporation which sold recordings under the Black Swan Records label. He was born on January 6, 1884 in Covington, Georgia.  His fatherdied while Harry was still an infant leaving him to be raised by his mother. Pace graduated from elementary school […]

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