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Gertrude Watson Goodridge: Wife of Famed Black Photographer, William O. Goodridge

Oct 08, 2019 12:17 am

Gertrude Watson Goodridge was the wife of famed black photographer, William O. Goodridge. At the age of twenty-eight, Goodridge became a widow when her husband died in an accident, leaving her to raise three young children, one daughter who was born after his death. The Goodridge Brothers owned and operated their own photography business. Brothers […]

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June 7, 1920: Ku Klux Klan Mounts Publicity Campaign to Attract Members [VIDEO]

Oct 08, 2019 12:17 am

The Ku Klux Klan was originally founded by Confederate veterans in Pulaski, Tennessee, in 1865, but had dissolved by the 1870’s. In 1915, the Klan was revived by William Simmons, which was the same year that D.W. Griffith’s film, “Birth of a Nation” debuted, which stereotyped blacks and portrayed the Klan as a heroic force. […]

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Paul Leroy Robeson: Entertainer, Activist, Blacklisted During McCarthyism

Oct 08, 2019 12:17 am

Paul Leroy Robeson was born April 9, 1898 in Princeton, New Jersey. His father was William D. Robeson, a prominent local minister who escaped from a plantation as a teenager, and his mother was Maria Louise Bustill, who was from a prominent and well settled Quaker family of English-American, Lenape Native, and West African descent. […]

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African Household Slaves: Tortured and Starved to Death by Serial Killer Delphine Lalaurie

Oct 08, 2019 12:17 am

The Lalaurie family were socialites among their community. They maintained several black slaves in slave quarters that were attached to the Royal Street Mansion in Louisiana. There are mixed accounts of Delphine Lalaurie’s treatment of her slaves between 1831 and 1834. In 1838, Harriet Martineau recounted tales told to her by New Orleans residents during her 1836 […]

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Herman Hodge Long: Adopted the Tagline “A Mind is A Terrible Thing to Waste” for UNCF

Oct 08, 2019 12:17 am

Herman Hodge Long was a college administrator and author of several studies pertaining to race relations. He served as president of his alma mater, Alabama’s Talladega College from May 2, 1912 to August 8, 1976. Long also served as president of the United Negro College Fund from 1970 to 1975. He adopted the tagline “A mind […]

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Kelly Miller Jr.: National Figure in the Debate on Race & Prolific Writer

Oct 08, 2019 12:17 am

Kelly Miller Jr. was a national figure in the debate on race in the United States. From his leadership at Howard and through his prolific writings, Miller became well-known. Miller was born on July 18 or 23, 1863, in Winnsboro, South Carolina, to Kelly Miller, Sr., a free black man, and Elizabeth Roberts, a slave. […]

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Georgia Douglas Johnson: Prominent Literary Figure of the Harlem Renaissance

Oct 08, 2019 12:17 am

Georgia Douglas Johnson was an important figure of the Harlem Renaissance, the literary and cultural movement that flourished throughout the streets of New York City. Johnson is best recognized for her four volumes of poetry, The Heart of a Woman (1918), Bronze (1922), An Autumn Love Cycle (1928), and Share My World (1962). Johnson was […]

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Mississippi Voting Rights Activist Vernon Dahmer Dies After Bombing [VIDEO]

Oct 08, 2019 12:17 am

In the early morning hours of January 10, 1966, about 10 miles outside of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, the home of businessman and activist Vernon Dahmer was firebombed. Dahmer was a successful black businessman who was active in the NAACP and the voting rights movement. Dahmer’s wife, Elli, and their children managed to escape, but Dahmer lost […]

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