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June 5, 1973: Doris A. Davis Defeated Incumbent Compton Mayor Douglas Dollarhide

May 08, 2020 01:21 pm

June 5, 1973: Doris A. Davis defeated incumbent Compton Mayor Douglas Dollarhide. By doing so, she became the first African-American woman mayor of a metropolitan city in the United States. However, after 4 years as mayor, she did not seek re-election. Eight years earlier, in 1965, Davis defeated incumbent Clyde Harland to become Compton’s first African American […]

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Walter L. Cohen, Sr: One of Few African Americans to Hold Political Office After Reconstruction

May 08, 2020 01:21 pm

Walter L. Cohen, Sr.  was an African-American Republican politician and businessman in the U.S. state of Louisiana. Cohen was born a free man of color in New Orleans on January 22, 1860. He was educated at St. Louis Catholic School and Straight College. An active member of Reconstruction politics. Cohen was one of the few […]

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June 5, 2008: Every Major League Baseball Team Symbolically Drafted Surviving Negro League Members

May 08, 2020 01:21 pm

June 5, 2008: Every major league baseball team symbolically drafted a surviving member of the Negro Leagues. Baseball Channel TV streamed the Negro Leagues Draft live in front of several hundred people at The Milk House at Disney’s Wide World of Sports Complex. The fans saw Major League Baseball tie up some of its loose […]

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Nellie Griswold Francis: Accomplished Contralto Singer

May 08, 2020 01:21 pm

Nellie Griswold Francis was an accomplished singer—a contralto—and appeared in many events as a soloist and in ensembles, mostly at her church, Plymouth Baptist. She often appeared there with another singer, William T. Francis. They married in 1893. Francis was born in Nashville in 1874 and arrived in St. Paul, Minnesota with her family in […]

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Author & Poet Langston Hughes’, “Mother to Son” Poem

May 08, 2020 01:21 pm

Mother to Son Well, son, I’ll tell you: Life for me ain’t been no crystal stair. It’s had tacks in it, And splinters, And boards torn up, And places with no carpet on the floor— Bare. But all the time I’se been a-climbin’ on, And reachin’ landin’s, And turnin’ corners, And sometimes goin’ in the […]

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Mattie Moss Clark: Renowned Gospel Choir Director and Mother of “The Clark Sisters”

May 08, 2020 01:21 pm

Mattie Moss Clark was an American gospel choir director and the mother of The Clark Sisters, a world-renowned gospel vocal group. Clark is credited for creating the three-part harmony (separating vocal parts into soprano, alto, and tenor), a technique which is prevalent among gospel choirs today Clark was born on March 26, 1925. When she […]

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Henry Plummer Cheatham: Educator, Farmer & Member of U.S. House of Representatives

May 08, 2020 01:21 pm

Henry Plummer Cheatham was an educator, farmer and politician, elected as a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from 1889 to 1893 from North Carolina. He was one of only five African Americans elected to Congress from the South in the Jim Crow era of the last decade of the nineteenth century, […]

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Kermit Gamaliel Bailer: Pioneer Detroit Lawyer of Civil Rights Cases & Public Service

May 08, 2020 01:21 pm

Kermit Gamaliel Bailer, a Detroit lawyer spent most of his career working on behalf of rights groups and in public service, including civil rights assignments in the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations. He was appointed by President John F. Kennedy to the United States Commission on Civil Rights in 1961 to work on urban renewal and […]

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Horace Rains: Physician and Community Activist During Civil Rights Movement

May 08, 2020 01:21 pm

Horace Rains was the first African-American physician on staff at St. Mary’s Long Beach Memorial and Long Beach Community Hospitals, both of which were active during the Civil Rights movement. Rains also served as president of the Long Beach NAACP. Rains was born in Atlanta to Igolias and Elizabeth Rains. He was one of three […]

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Erma Henderson: Detroit’s First Black Councilwoman

May 08, 2020 01:21 pm

Erma Henderson was once considered one of the most powerful black women in the Detroit’s history. Henderson joined the council by winning a runoff election to fill a vacancy in 1972 and was re-elected the following year. She received the most votes in 1977, 1981 and 1985 council elections and served as its president. Henderson […]

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