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Charles Walter David, Jr: Coast Guardsman Rescued 93 Crew Members in Icy Water

Feb 10, 2020 10:57 am

Charles Walter David, Jr. was a Coast Guardsman who served on board the CGC Comanche on North Atlantic convoy duty during World War II.  David was born in 1917 and lived in New York before joining the United States Coast Guard. On February 3, 1943, the U.S. Army transport USS Dorchester was torpedoed by a […]

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Calvin Woodrow Ruck: Third Black Canadian Appointed to the Canadian Senate

Feb 10, 2020 10:57 am

Calvin Woodrow Ruck CM was an anti-racism activist and a member of the Canadian Senate. He also was a as a human rights activist, social worker, and author. Ruck was born in Sydney, Nova Scotia, to parents who had immigrated from Barbados. He left school after completing the 10th grade to take a job as […]

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A Letter From Frederick Douglass To Harriet Tubman

Feb 10, 2020 10:57 am

Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman were the most eminent African-American figures of their time. The two were born four years apart and both knew what it was like to be enslaved. Both were born into slavery, escaped to freedom, and did not turn their backs on others who were enslaved. They began their own personal […]

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Benjamin Banneker’s 1791 Letter to Thomas Jefferson; Jefferson’s Reply

Feb 10, 2020 10:57 am

First published in 1791, Benjamin Banneker’s almanacs were widely distributed publications.Benjamin Banneker (b. 11/9/1731, Maryland – d. 10/9/1806) was an astronomer, mathematician, clockmaker, farmer, author of almanacs and one of the three city surveyors for Washington D.C. As a country, the U.S. was not quite 20 years old when Banneker was appointed city planner to the District of Columbia by U.S. President George Washington. Banneker’s […]

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Branding of Slaves: Brutal Act Used for Identification Purposes and Severe Punishment

Feb 10, 2020 10:57 am

Branding of African-American slaves was common throughout the Antebellum south. The brutal and harsh act was performed both for identification purposes and as a form of punishment. Slave branding is the process in which a mark, usually a symbol or ornamental pattern, was burned into the skin of a living slave with the intention to […]

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Ed Dwight Jr.: First African American Astronaut Candidate for NASA & Sculptor

Feb 10, 2020 10:57 am

Ed Dwight Jr. was the first African American astronaut candidate for what is now NASA. After the death of President Kennedy, he resigned in 1966, never having gone into space. Dwight’s talents then led him to work as an engineer. Dwight was born in the Kansas City, Kansas area on September 9, 1933 to Edward […]

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Education: The Burning Desire of Freedmen and Slaves

Feb 10, 2020 10:57 am

To obtain an education was the burning desire of most free blacks, especially those who had once been slaves. There were no schools in the south and very few public schools in the north that allowed black residents to attend. From 1829 to 1849, Ohio excluded black students from their public schools, and most of […]

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Miriam Matthews: “The Dean of Los Angeles Black History”

Feb 10, 2020 10:57 am

Miriam Matthews, often referred to as the Dean of Los Angeles Black History, became the first African-American librarian in California. Matthews was hired as a librarian by the Los Angeles Public Library in 1927. Matthews was born in Pensacola, Florida in 1905, the second of three children born to Fannie Elijah and Reuben Hearde Matthews. […]

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