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[Video] Weeksville: Thriving Community of African Americans in New York During the Late 1830s

Aug 10, 2020 08:18 am

Weeksville was a village of free African Americans founded just after the abolition of slavery in New York. In 1838, only 11 years after slavery ended in New York, Weeksville was formed by a free black man named James Weeks when he purchased a substantial area of land from Henry C. Thompson, another free black […]

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Luther P. Jackson: Civil Rights Activist Encouraged Blacks to Vote & Own Property

Aug 10, 2020 08:18 am

Luther P. Jackson was a professor at Virginia State University who urged blacks to vote and own property as ways to secure their citizenship. He is regarded as one of the precursors to the modern civil rights movement. Jackson was born in Lexington, Kentucky, on July 11, 1892, into a family of twelve children. He […]

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Black Abolitionists: Sarah Smith Tompkins Garnet The First African American Female Principal in The New York Public Schools

Aug 10, 2020 08:18 am

By Lestey Gist, The Gist of Freedom Sarah Smith Tompkins Garnet was the first African-American female principal in the New York public schools. The eldest of eleven children, she was born Minsarah Smith in Brooklyn in 1831. Her parents were prosperous farmers, and one of her sisters, Susan Smith McKinney Steward (1847-1918), was the first African-American female […]

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Poem: “Coal” by Audre Lorde

Aug 10, 2020 08:18 am

Audre Lorde was a writer, feminist, womanist, librarian, and civil rights activist. As a poet, she is best known for technical mastery and emotional expression, as well as her poems that express anger . Lorde dedicated both her life and her creative talent to confronting and addressing the injustices of racism, sexism, and homophobia in […]

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Renowned Black Historian Dr. Patricia Hilliard-Nunn Passes Away in Florida

Aug 10, 2020 08:18 am

Dr. Patricia Hilliard-Nunn (pictured), whose research brought to light the ugly history of racism and lynching in Alachua County, Florida, has died of cancer. She advocated for truth and reconciliation over that past. Hilliard-Nunn was known for her calm presence as much as for her relentless exploration of racial history. She was a senior lecturer […]

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The Door Of No Return For An African Slave (Video)

Aug 10, 2020 08:18 am

Published on Jun 24, 2014 In 1739 Venture Smith took this canoe ride out into the Atlantic to take the Middle Passage to 26 years of slavery in New England. He redeemed himself to regain his freedom in 1765.

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Anne Moody: Civil Rights Activist & Author of “Coming of Age in Mississippi”

Aug 10, 2020 08:18 am

Anne Moody was an author who wrote about her experiences growing up poor and black in rural Mississippi, in her book “Coming of Age in Mississippi.” She was also greatly active in the Civil Rights Movement through the NAACP, CORE, and SNCC. Born Essie Mae Moody on September 15, 1940, near the town of Centreville […]

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Ella Jenkins: Earned the Distinction as the “First Lady of Children’s Folk Song”

Aug 10, 2020 08:18 am

Folk singer Ella Jenkins entertained children in a musical career for almost fifty years and has performed for children all over the world. During her youth, Jenkins mastered playing over fifty world instruments including the maracas, ukulele, and Kalumba drum. Born Ella Louise Jenkins on August 6, 1924, in St. Louis, she was reared in […]

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Richard “Dick” Griffey: Music Industry Kingpin [VIDEO]

Aug 10, 2020 08:18 am

Watch the trailer for the new documentary drama In The Hour Of Chaos, written and directed by Bayer Mack SYNOPSIS Richard Gilbert “Dick” Griffey (November 16, 1938 – September 24, 2010) was an American record producer and music promoter who founded SOLAR Records. After briefly attending Tennessee State University, Dick Griffey enlisted in the United […]

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KoKo Taylor: Powerful Singer Often Referred to as the “Queen of the Blues” (Video)

Aug 10, 2020 08:18 am

Koko Taylor, dubbed as “The Queen of the Blues,” was known for her powerful and rough vocals often heard when she was singing the blues. Taylor, daughter of a sharecropper, was born with the name Cora Walton on a farm near Memphis, Tennessee. In 1952, she moved with her husband, Robert “Pops” Taylor, to Chicago. […]

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