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The Euphemism “Tuskegee Time Machine” Coined by W.E.B. Du Bois

Mar 23, 2020 08:35 am

The Tuskegee Time Machine was a popular expression used during the early twentieth century by black intellectuals including Monroe Trotter, and W. E. B. Du Bois. The Tuskegee Machine referred to the financial control used over black education, particularly, over black newspapers and periodicals by Booker T. Washington. By 1904, Washington had successfully surrounded himself […]

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Horace M. Bond: Highly-Regarded Teacher, Administrator

Mar 23, 2020 08:35 am

Horace Mann Bond served as the first president of Fort Valley State College and as president of Lincoln University from 1945 to 1957. He was also the father to the acclaimed civil rights activist, Julian Bond. Bond was born on November 8, 1904, in Nashville, Tennessee, to Jane Alice Browne and James Bond. Both his […]

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Carl Maxey: Spokane’s First Prominent Black Attorney and Civil Rights Leader

Mar 23, 2020 08:35 am

Carl Maxey was Spokane’s first prominent black attorney and an influential and controversial civil-rights leader. He was born in 1924 in Tacoma and raised as an orphan in Spokane. He overcame an almost Dickensian childhood to become a household name in Eastern Washington, beginning in the 1940s when he won the NCAA boxing championship for […]

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Tice Davids: The Runaway That Started “The Underground Railroad”

Mar 23, 2020 08:35 am

In 1831, Tice Davids, a runaway slave, fled from his owner in Kentucky. Davids swam across the Ohio River with his owner in close pursuit in a boat. Davids reached the Ohio shore at the town of Ripley just a few minutes before his owner, but the owner could not find his slave. The owner […]

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Remembering “Mr. Wonderful:” Sammy Davis, Jr.

Mar 23, 2020 08:35 am

On this day in 1990, entertainment legend Sammy Davis, Jr., passed away at his Beverly Hills home at the age of 64. Born on December 8, 1925, in New York City to a show business family, he played a pivotal role in breaking down racial barriers as he established himself as one of the greatest […]

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Black Soldiers Were On The Frontline Of The Union Army And Instrumental In The Monumental Battle At Appomattox

Mar 23, 2020 08:35 am

Members of the black community played a major role in the American Civil War with regiments on both the confederate and Union sides.  It is however not common knowledge that the black troops were regularly placed at the frontline of the Union army and were instrumental in the monumental battle at Appomattox which happened on […]

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Ann Moore Gregory: Dubbed “The Queen of Negro Golf”

Mar 23, 2020 08:35 am

Ann Moore Gregory was a pioneering African-American female golfer. Gregory took home over 400 trophies and won over 300 golf tournaments from all over the world in the span of her career. Gregory was born in Aberdeen, Mississippi, on July 25, 1912. She was the middle child of five to Henry and Myra Moore. When […]

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After the Emancipation Proclamation: Slaves Kept in the Dark About Being Free

Mar 23, 2020 08:35 am

After the Emancipation Proclamation, some slave owners hid the news from their slaves of their freedom. It was not until Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger arrived with 2000 troops traveling into Galveston, Texas, that many slaves learned of their freedom. One woman, a former slave named Tempie Cummins, told the Federal Writers’ Project in 1939 that her […]

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Anna Pauli Murray: Prolific Writer, First African-American Woman Episcopal Priest

Mar 23, 2020 08:35 am

Anna Pauline “Pauli” Murray was an outspoken civil rights activist, lawyer, professor, and writer. Murray was born on November 20, 1910, in Baltimore, Maryland. After losing her parents at a young age, she was sent to North Carolina to be raised by her aunt. After high school, Murray applied to the University of North Carolina […]

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Poet Robert Hayden’s, “Frederick Douglas”

Mar 23, 2020 08:35 am

Frederick Douglass When it is finally ours, this freedom, this liberty, this beautiful and terrible thing, needful to man as air, usable as earth; when it belongs at last to all, when it is truly instinct, brain matter, diastole, systole, reflex action; when it is finally won; when it is more than the gaudy mumbo […]

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