Copy

facebook twitter pinterest Like Linda Brown: Girl at Center of Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court Case Dies on Facebook
Sponsored by:
 

Linda Brown: Girl at Center of Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court Case Dies

Feb 26, 2021 02:40 pm

Linda Brown, who was at the forefront of fighting racial segregation in U.S. schools, has died, according to news reports. In 1954 the Supreme Court found in the landmark decision — involving Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka and other legal cases — that the doctrine of “separate but equal” has no place in […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Linda Brown: Girl at Center of Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court Case Dies on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor: English Composer & Conductor

Feb 26, 2021 02:40 pm

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor was an English composer and conductor who was mixed-race; his father was a Sierra Leone Creole physician. Coleridge-Taylor was born in Croydon, England, on August 15, 1875. His father, a doctor from Sierra Leone, was forced to return to his home country around the time of Samuel’s birth because he was not permitted […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Samuel Coleridge-Taylor: English Composer & Conductor on Facebook Google Plus One Button

List of African Americans who have recently received the Spingarn medal

Feb 26, 2021 02:40 pm

The Spingarn Medal is awarded annually by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) for the brilliant achievement of African Americans. The award which consists of a gold medal was introduced in 1914 by Joel Elias Spingarn who was the chairman of the Board of the NAACP. In 1915, biologist Ernest E. […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like List of African Americans who have recently received the Spingarn medal on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Bonanza Race War of 1904: Successful Attempt to Drive Black Workers Out of Coal Mines

Feb 26, 2021 02:40 pm

The Bonanza Race War of 1904 was a race riot/labor war that occurred in the coal-mining city of  Bonanza, Sebastian and resulted in the expulsion of African Americans from the city following several days of violence. The event is indicative of a general antipathy toward black labor in the coal mines of western Arkansas, and, […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Bonanza Race War of 1904: Successful Attempt to Drive Black Workers Out of Coal Mines on Facebook Google Plus One Button

February 25: Happy Birthday to Actress & Supermodel Veronica Webb

Feb 26, 2021 02:40 pm

Photo credits: Mike Ruiz for PhotoBook Magazine Veronica Webb (pictured) is an African American model, actress, writer, and television personality. Webb was the first African American to have a major cosmetics contract when she signed with Revlon in 1992. Webb also appeared on the covers of Vogue, Essence, and Elle magazines. She had the opportunity to be on the runway for Victoria’s Secret […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like February 25: Happy Birthday to Actress & Supermodel Veronica Webb on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Seaborn J. Collins: Instrumental in Developing the Baptist Faith Throughout Seattle, WA

Feb 26, 2021 02:40 pm

Seaborn J. Collins was instrumental in developing the Baptist faith throughout the Seattle, WA area for African Americans. Collins was born and raised in Georgia. He moved to the Seattle area with his wife, Alzada, and son in 1885. After arriving in Seattle, Collins found work as a mechanic and carpenter. He would later invest […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Seaborn J. Collins: Instrumental in Developing the Baptist Faith Throughout Seattle, WA on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Civil Rights Protests in Danville, 1963

Feb 26, 2021 02:40 pm

The most violent episodes of the civil rights movement in Virginia took place in Danville, Virginia during the summer of 1963. About 47,000 people lived in Danville during the 1960s. Most of the citizens were employed either the textiles or tobacco industries and a third of the population were African American. Throughout the summer nearly […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Civil Rights Protests in Danville, 1963 on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Today in 1864, Rebecca Crumpler Became the First Black American Woman to Earn an M.D.

Feb 26, 2021 02:40 pm

Photo credits: PBS/HubHistory Rebecca Lee Crumpler challenged the prejudice that prevented African Americans from pursuing careers in medicine. She became the first African American woman in the United States to earn an M.D. degree–a distinction formerly credited to Rebecca Cole. Although little has survived to tell the story of Crumpler’s life, she has secured her […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Today in 1864, Rebecca Crumpler Became the First Black American Woman to Earn an M.D. on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Emma Ray: Founded the Frances Harper Colored Unit of Women’s Christian Temperance Union

Feb 26, 2021 02:40 pm

Emma Ray ministered to the poor and homeless in Seattle slums along with her husband, L.P. Ray was born into slavery in 1859 and raised in poverty in Missouri. She arrived in Seattle following the 1889 fire in order to help her husband find work as a stonemason. Shortly after arriving Ray and her husband […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Emma Ray: Founded the Frances Harper Colored Unit of Women’s Christian Temperance Union on Facebook Google Plus One Button

Remembering The Forgotten: Denmark Vesey, The Charleston Church Founder Who Was A Slave Rebellion Leader

Feb 26, 2021 02:40 pm

Denmark Vessey, the leader of a historic slave rebellion was a founding member of the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina.   Wednesday’s tragic shooting has thrusted Denmark Vesey back into the national spotlight as many noted that the shooting described as a hate crime took place nearly 200 years after Vesey unsuccessfully tried to […]

Read More
share on Twitter Like Remembering The Forgotten: Denmark Vesey, The Charleston Church Founder Who Was A Slave Rebellion Leader on Facebook Google Plus One Button
COPYRIGHT (C) 2016 - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED - BLACK THEN
Unsubscribe