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“The Syracuse 8”: African American Football Players Who Demanded Equality on the Field

Feb 01, 2019 03:54 am

The “Syracuse 8” were college football players in 1970 who boycotted football season in a collective effort to demand changes and promote racial equality within the University football program. The students wanted better medical care for injured players and stronger academic support for the Black student-athletes. The group also stressed that they should be able […]

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The Longest Serving Black Representative during the Post-Slavery Era

Feb 01, 2019 03:54 am

BY WALTER OPINDE Nobody could ever imagine of an African-American serving for more than two decades in the U.S. House of Representatives during the racially-divided post-slavery era. Nevertheless, to overcome this stereotypical perception, Mr. William Levi Dawson (a Black American) broke the records for representing Chicago, Illinois for more than 27 years in the U.S. […]

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The Great African-American Migration

Feb 01, 2019 03:54 am

BY WALTER OPINDE The Great Migration was a historic migration of the African-Americans from the rural regions of the Southern U.S. to the urban areas of the Western, Midwestern, and Northwestern United States. It occurred during the period between the 1916 and 1970s. This migration marked a very significant turn of the American demographic history […]

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Sergeant William Harvey Carney: First African American Awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor

Feb 01, 2019 03:54 am

Sergeant William Harvey Carney was the first African American to be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.  He was born a slave in Norfolk, Virginia, but escaped to Massachusetts like his father through the Underground Railroad. His family later followed through the Underground Railroad as well. The free and reunited family settled in New Bedford […]

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Pierre Caliste Landry: First Known African-American Mayor in the United States

Feb 01, 2019 03:54 am

Pierre Caliste Landry was born on April 19, 1841. He is credited as being the first African-American mayor in the United States. Landry was also a minister, businessman, educator, and attorney. He was born to Rosemond Landry, a white laborer on the Prevost plantation and Marcelite, his slave mistress. Landry grew up with a free couple […]

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Seneca Village: The Black Community That Was Destroyed To Create Central Park

Feb 01, 2019 03:54 am

Seneca Village began in 1825 with the purchase of land by a trustee of AME Zion Church. Following his purchase, this African-American community grew steadily and was later supplemented by Irish immigrants moving to the area. Both populations were marginalized and faced similar discrimination throughout the city. Remarkably, despite their social and racial conflicts elsewhere, […]

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