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Alyene Quin: Civil Rights Activist Affectionately Called by SNCC Workers “Mama Quin”

Nov 09, 2020 01:28 pm

Alyene Quin, or Mama Quin, as she was affectionately called by SNCC workers, owned a small business establishment on Summit Street in Mississippi which became a center of civil rights activity in the McComb Movement. Threats against her home business came in response to her strong leadership in the Movement. Quinn was born in Walthall […]

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Poem: The Good Life by Tracy K. Smith

Nov 09, 2020 01:28 pm

Tracy K. Smith was born in Massachusetts and raised in northern California. She earned a BA from Harvard University and an MFA in creative writing from Columbia University. From 1997 to 1999 she held a Stegner fellowship at Stanford University. Smith is the author of three books of poetry: The Body’s Question (2003), which won […]

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Slide Guitar Legend: Robert Nighthawk

Nov 09, 2020 01:28 pm

Known as Robert Nighthawk, Robert Lee McCollum was a blues musician hailing from Helena, Arkansas. Born in 1909, McCollum would begin his career in music very early.   Early Career He was originally based in Mississippi but left for Memphis’ blues scene. During his time here, he would improve and pick up some techniques from veteran players. His career saw major progression after he learned steel guitar. This […]

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Modern Response to 1966 Ebony Edition “Are Negro Girls Getting Prettier”

Nov 09, 2020 01:28 pm

By Marissa Johnson Ebony magazine published a controversial edition in February 1966 posing the question “Are Negro Girls Getting Prettier?” Never mind that the word “negro” might draw a wince from readers in this new millennium. The issue was a hot button one then, and it is so today as well. The magazine cover features […]

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Black To The Future: Kanye West Tops The Time’s List Of 100 Most Influential People

Nov 09, 2020 01:28 pm

Time magazine has released its list of 100 most influential people, and topping the list is Kanye West, who is also on the cover. Of course, as Tesla CEO Elon Musk points out in Time’s cover story, West “would be the first person to tell you he belongs on this list.” “The dude doesn’t believe […]

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Sam Carr: Pioneering Delta Blues Drummer

Nov 09, 2020 01:28 pm

Born April 17, 1926, in Marvell, Arkansas as Samuel Lee McCollum, Sam Carr got his start in music at 16 as a self-taught musician. After a few years of sharecropping with his wife, Carr left Arkansas for Chicago and St. Louis where he played for a number of local blues acts. He is the son of blues guitar legend Robert Nighthawk.   Career Early on, Sam Carr played bass guitar […]

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Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller: Sculptor Notable for Celebrating Afrocentric Themes

Nov 09, 2020 01:28 pm

Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller was an African-American artist notable for celebrating Afrocentric themes. She was known as a multi-talented artist who wrote poetry, painted, and sculpted. Fuller is noted as one of the first prominent women sculptors. Fuller was born on June 9, 1877, to William and Emma Warrick, who owned a barbershop and made […]

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Poem: “People Equal by Jamaican Poet James Berry

Nov 09, 2020 01:28 pm

Poet James Berry is notable for using a mixture of standard English and Jamaican Patois. Berry’s writing often “explores the relationship between black and white communities and in particular, the excitement and tensions in the evolving relationship of the Caribbean immigrants with Britain and British society from the 1940s onwards.” Born in coastal Jamaica in […]

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National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs: Oldest Black American Organization In Existence

Nov 09, 2020 01:28 pm

By Amandeep T. The National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs, Inc. (NACWC) is the oldest African-American secular organization in existence today. The National Association of Colored Women’s Club, Inc. was founded in Washington, D.C. in July 1896 by Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin and the merger of the National Federation of African-American Women. This federation was […]

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The Ole Miss Riot of 1962

Nov 09, 2020 01:28 pm

The Ole Miss riot of 1962, or Battle of Oxford, was fought between Southern segregationist civilians and federal and state forces beginning the night of September 30, 1962. Segregationists were protesting the enrollment of James Meredith, a black US military veteran, at the University of Mississippi (known as Ole Miss) at Oxford, Mississippi. Two civilians […]

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