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Arthur Alfonso Schomburg: Helped Lay the Foundation for African-American Studies

Jan 17, 2020 12:10 pm

Arthur “Arturo” Alfonso Schomburg was a pioneering historian and scholar who helped lay the foundation for the field of African and African-American studies. Schomburg dedicated his life to educating, collecting, and sharing research about the black experience. Schomburg was born on January 24, 1874, in Puerto Rico. His mother, Mary Joseph, never married his father, […]

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Nella Larsen: Novelist of the Harlem Renaissance

Jan 17, 2020 12:10 pm

Nella Larsen was an African-American novelist who wrote several pieces during the Harlem Renaissance. Larsen’s work was recognized as being of great quality by her peers and critics. She went by several different names throughout her life, including Nellie Walker, Nellye Larson, Nellie Larsen and, finally, Nella Larsen as well as by her married name Nella Larsen […]

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The Maji Maji Rebellion Pt. III: Famine and Warfare

Jan 17, 2020 12:10 pm

A little over a week following the death of Bokero, the Maji Maji Rebellion continued. Ngindo rebels cornered Catholic missionaries out on safari. All five would end up speared to death before but they weren’t done. The Ngindo rebels raged throughout Tanzania, attacking garrisons and other fortifications. The Battle at Mahenge In late August, the […]

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The Maji Maji Rebellion Pt. II: Bokero’s Fall

Jan 17, 2020 12:10 pm

Bokero was a medium who mysteriously arrived on the scene to brew a rebellion against the Germans in the summer of 1905–the Maji Maji Rebellion. Just a year prior, he disappeared from his Ngarambe residence where he went on a bit of a spiritual quest and claimed to have gained the ability to talk with […]

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The Maji Maji Rebellion: Enter Bokero

Jan 17, 2020 12:10 pm

The Maji Maji Rebellion was one of many uprisings against colonial power in Africa during the 19th and 20th centuries. This particular rebellion was also similar to others in that it was ignited as a result of a superpower’s greed and aggressive taxing policies. Grim times can lead to the rise of unexpected leaders–such is […]

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Flash Black Photo: African American Couple

Jan 17, 2020 12:10 pm

Description: African American man and woman holding newborn sitting on front porch. Vintage African American photography courtesy of Black History Album, The Way We Were. Found On Flicker.com in Black History Album

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William Henry “Chick” Webb: Renowned Jazz, Swing Music Drummer and Band Leader [VIDEO]

Jan 17, 2020 12:10 pm

William Henry Webb, known as “Chick Webb,” was an American jazz, swing music drummer, and one of the top band leaders of his time. Webb was born February 10, 1905, in Baltimore, Maryland, to William H. and Marie Webb. He suffered from tuberculosis at a young age, leaving him with short stature and a badly deformed spine, […]

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William Lambert: Helped Organize the First State Convention of Colored Citizens in Michigan

Jan 17, 2020 12:10 pm

William Lambert was an abolitionist who helped organize the first State Convention of Colored Citizens in the state of Michigan. Lambert was born in Trenton, New Jersey in 1817, the son of a freed father and freeborn mother. As a young boy, he was educated by abolitionist Quakers. He later moved to Detroit, Michigan in […]

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Maritime Underground Railroad: Fugitive Slaves Traveling by Ship to Freedom

Jan 17, 2020 12:10 pm

The town of Edenton, North Carolina, provided slaves a means of escape with the Maritime Underground Railroad before Emancipation. On this underground network,  people helped slaves travel by vessel from the southern part of the United States to the North and Canada. On most ships, blacks worked as stewards and cooks; they worked in the areas of the ship […]

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Blaxploitation: How Black 70’s Films Changed The Portrayal Of African American’s In Hollywood

Jan 17, 2020 12:10 pm

Big Afros, Big Guns, and Big Cars. The holy trinity of seventies Black cinema affectionately dubbed “Blaxploitation”. The term itself is a portmanteau of the words “black” and “exploitation”. It was originally coined in the early 70s by the Los Angeles National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) head, and ex-film publicist Junius Griffin. The […]

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