Tips on how to find wintering birds. Also, providing water in your yard is a great way to attract birds! Learn how to do it in winter.
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An e-newsletter brought to you by the publishers of Bird Watcher’s Digest and Watching Backyard Birds. Proudly sponored by Carl Zeiss Sports Optics.

Where Do You Look for Birds in Winter?

Finding Birds in Winter
The key to finding birds is finding their food source. While that’s true any time of year, food options dwindle in winter, making birding more challenging. From farm fields to landfills to coastal inlets, Pete Dunne offers tips on where to find wintering birds as they seek out new food sources.
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Habitat Is Where It's At!

The Adirondacks has a variety of habitats that attract a diverse array of birds year-round. Visit our boreal forests, mixed hardwood stands, wetlands, and open waters and get ready to check some species off your list!

Did You Know? Chickadees Have a Remarkable Memory
Did You Know? Chickadees Have a Remarkable Memory
Humans could only wish to possess a “bird brain,” especially that of the chickadee, whose memory is capable of recalling the thousands of locations it has stashed seeds for the winter—and even prioritizing where to retrieve the higher-quality seeds first! Learn how the remarkable chickadee increases its brain size in order to survive the lean winter months.
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Top 10 Tips for Attracting Birds with Water
Top 10 Tips for Attracting Birds with Water
A sure way to increase the number of avian visitors to your yard this winter is to provide a consistent supply of open drinking water. These tips will help you determine what kind of birdbath is best, where to place it, and how to maintain it.
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My Way: Use a Heated Dog Dish for a Winter Bird Bath!
Providing Fresh Water for Birds When Temperatures Plunge
If you live where the water will freeze, consider using a heated birdbath. Providing one might be easier than you think! One BWD reader in Alberta, Canada, lives in a location where below-freezing temperatures are the norm for about half the year, and experienced a great deal of frustration and limited success in providing fresh water for her backyard birds. She stumbled upon an innovative solution, which she shared in BWD's "My Way" column.
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#BirdsOnTheBrain
ATTENTION, BIRDWIRE SUBSCRIBERS: We want to hear from you! Each issue of BirdWire will include a poll question for our audience. Visit our website to offer your input and see results from your fellow readers!
Today's poll question: Do you listen to podcasts about birding and conservation?
RESULTS OF OUR LAST POLL: In the last issue of BirdWire, we asked if you will travel outside the continental U.S. to experience birds and nature. The results were nearly even: 55% of respondents said yes and 45% said no. Thanks to all who participated!



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Attention, BirdWire Readers: Participate in Our Blurry Bird Contest!
Attention, BirdWire Readers: Participate in Our #BlurryBirds Photo Contest!
You might be familiar with our #TamronTuesdays, featuring gorgeous photographs taken by our talented production director, Bruce Wunderlich. But our assistant editor, Jessica Melfi—who just recently took up bird photography—would like to introduce #BlurryBirds, a contest to celebrate those of us still trying to figure out what all those settings on our camera are for. To participate, just head on over to our Facebook page and post your best (or should we say worst?) blurry bird photo with the hashtag #BlurryBirds by January 26. We'll select our favorite, and the winner will receive a BWD bino harness!
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On Newsstands Now:
Watching Backyard Birds: Feb. 2020
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If you love backyard birds, then you should be reading Watching Backyard Birds. It's the ONLY North American magazine devoted exclusively to backyard birds and the people who watch and enjoy them. Created by the friendly staff at Bird Watcher's Digest, every issue of Watching Backyard Birds is full of engaging, entertaining, and enlightening content and images.
  • Get one year (6 bimonthly issues) only $16.00*
  • Print subscribers get the digital issue FREE!
* Canadian and international shipping apply. Orders shipping to Ohio are subject to sales tax.
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OUR COVER SPECIES
Juncos
The jaunty little junco—popularly known as the snowbird—with its “leaden sky above, snow below” coloration, is a welcome sight and symbol of winter for many across North America.
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SPECIAL FEATURE
Love / Birds
We know that birds and humans share some emotions, with fear being perhaps the most obvious. But what about love? Although we like to think of paired birds as “married,” among backyard birds, mating for life is the exception, not the rule.
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SPECIAL FEATURE
Top Ten Early Signs of Spring
February still means frigid temperatures and snowfall for many, but you will find hints of spring emerging if you pause long enough to listen closely, watch mindfully, and breathe deeply.


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Copyright © 2020 Bird Watcher’s Digest. All rights reserved.


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